Quick Look: Complete Communications

The necessary reference for any network.

How many times have you tried to do something with your network and couldn't quite get the technology right? How many times did you go looking for some explanation of how something worked? Or how many times did you just want to know how something worked, but didn't really want to have to mine for the information?

Pro: Comprehensive, complete reference covers lots of subjects.
Con: 1,075 pages of technical info may be a tad daunting to casual readers.
Verdict: Necessary for anyone involved in communications technology

Well, as a communications junkie, I've asked all these questions at one point or another. That's why I found this Communications Handbook a great addition to my library. Each chapter is filled with great information, some covering the basics, others getting pretty advanced.

If you're a technologist of any kind and do any business in communications, this book needs to be at least on your shelf, if not bent up, worn down, dog-eared and read.

About the Author

Rick A. Butler, MCSE+I, is the Director of Information Services for the United States Hang Gliding Association.

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