In-Depth

Amazing Stories

If your company's considering a migration or upgrade from Windows NT 4.0 to 2000, these true tales of woe and triumph will help you make the journey fearlessly.


You may know how switching from a Windows NT 4.0 environment to Windows 2000 works according to Microsoft: Upgrade or migrate the PDC, then the BDCs, then machines, groups and users. Collapse resource and other domains into a more manageable domain structure through the use of Organizational Units. Properly configure DNS, DHCP and possibly WINS. Stir ingredients together and bake for two hours at 400 degrees, and you'll have a new, hot, fresh-out-of-the-oven Win2K network.

In the real world, it's not quite so easy. For these two IT managers, things were more problematic than the cut-and-dried Microsoft vision. They tell you, in their own words, about their adventures and misadventures in moving from the old to the new.

And, in an ongoing migration, Melissa Lamoreux details a careful Win2K migration in "Win2K's My Destination." When Melissa's team finally makes the transition, we've asked her to keep us apprised of any new developments.

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