Dell Beefs Up Servers

From news of virtual servers to news of real servers -- Dell's giving its PowerEdge servers more horsepower.

The PowerEdge R900 rack server is at the top of the line. This model is designed for enterprise-level data centers and powered by Intel's new Penryn chip (see my previous entry). The new and improved line also includes the PowerEdge R200 and PowerEdge T105 servers. The R200 is suited for cluster and network computing, while the T105 is an entry-level system targeted toward small businesses.

You'll also be able tell a lot more about Dell's servers just by their name. The new naming convention will indicate server type (T for tower, M for modular or R for rack). It'll also indicate the number of sockets, and whether it's Intel- or AMD-based.

Overall, Dell's intent in beefing up its servers is to make them operate more efficiently, and to include Dell's OpenManage system management tools.

Are you in the market for some high-power servers? How are you redeploying and reconfiguring your servers to accommodate new technologies? Let me know your server strategy at [email protected].

Posted by Lafe Low on 11/14/2007 at 1:23 PM


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