IBM Improves Recycling

It's not the easiest recycling task on the planet, but IBM has developed a better method for recycling excess silicon generated during its manufacturing processes.

Before reselling or reusing bits and pieces of silicon, as is the common practice, they often required cleansing with toxic chemicals. Instead of an acid bath, IBM engineers have developed a way to remove the imprinted circuitry with water and abrasive pads -- like those green pads you use to wash the dishes. This saves money, doesn't damage the silicon chip as much and doesn't generate any toxic waste. Besides reducing the environmental impact, IBM expects to save as much as $1.5 million a year.

Saving the environment and saving a pile of money -- sounds good to me. What are some of the energy-saving measure you've put into place in your organization? How do you recycle and reuse? Let me know at [email protected], and we may be able to include your stories in an upcoming feature in Redmond magazine.

Posted by Lafe Low on 10/31/2007 at 1:23 PM


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