Microsoft May No Longer Be Appealing

The long-running feud between our favorite technology vendor and the European Union antitrust watchdog may finally be winding down. The European Court of First Instance ruled largely against Microsoft in the company's appeal of a previous ruling -- that Microsoft Windows server software and media player unfairly leveraged the company's dominant market position. The 2004 ruling by the Competition Commission was based on Microsoft actions that go as far back as 1998.

The court did rule in Microsoft's favor in one instance, rejecting the Competition Commission's ruling to appoint a third party -- which was being paid by Microsoft -- to monitor the company's compliance. Microsoft still has to pay fines and restitution valued at over $600 million.

I originally thought that this would be the last appeal left for Microsoft, but there's apparently one last possibility: an appeal to the Court of Justice of the European Communities. According to the article linked above, Microsoft has two months to appeal, though the appeal would be limited to points of law only. That means the findings stand.

Although the law may finally be winding its way to a conclusion, has justice been done? Tell me what justice is at [email protected].

Posted by Peter Varhol on 09/18/2007 at 1:23 PM


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