Hackers Get Into Pentagon E-Mail

The Pentagon yesterday revealed that hackers had gotten into an unclassified e-mail system in Defense Secretary Robert Gates' office. Apparently, the break-in happened last spring, and the system went down for three weeks after that. While the system is within Gates' office, the Pentagon claims there was never a threat to classified systems.

Speculations were flying that the Chinese military was responsible for the hack, although Washington made no official accusation and, naturally, Chinese officials denied any involvement. Such ruffling of feathers on both sides comes at a delicate time as China defends itself in the face of numerous product recalls.

Pentagon officials minimized the seriousness of the event, saying that hackers try to penetrate the Pentagon's global network hundreds of times a day. Only a few of the most serious attempts are investigated further.

Does this scare you as much as it does me? Do you think it was a domestic miscreant or foreign nation? How do you go about securing your own e-mail infrastructure? Send me a secure, non-hackable message at [email protected].

Posted by Lafe Low on 09/05/2007 at 1:23 PM


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