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Am I Wrong About Cloud Security?

If you're like me you are frustrated that after years -- in fact, decades -- of fighting hackers and building all manner of security software, we are still way to vulnerable. In fact I don't feel one bit safer.

It's kind of like the arms race -- there are more and more hackers with more and more tools. And it's far too easy for script kiddies to get a hold of malware, make a little tweak and set off on a new attack. And criminal and political (countries and movements) hackers are more organized and better backed. All the security companies can do is to keep up.

I wrote about this recently and made the observation that moving apps and data to the cloud may be safer. A lot of the OS-based vectors such as Windows DLL would presumably be entirely closed.

Wow, did I get slapped upside the head by you, the loyal Redmondmag.com reader. Despite the ringing in my ears, I still think the theory has merit. I've never had any of my data in the cloud or Web apps compromised. Maybe I'm just lucky.

Still, I always think reader reaction to what I say is far more important that one I say. If you agree, you can follow the original point and the pounding that followed here.

Is the cloud more stable? Wow, did I get nailed.

Posted by Doug Barney on 12/05/2012 at 1:19 PM


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