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Microsoft To Raise CAL Prices by 15 Percent

We may not technically be in a recession but most of aren't exactly swimming in cash. What a perfect time for Microsoft to raise client access licenses (CALs) by 15 percent, a move that kicks in this Saturday.

I'm not sure if Microsoft reads the papers but there are a ton of alternatives for each and every thing Microsoft produces. That's why in nearly all of these markets competitors are gaining.

Microsoft justifies the CAL increase because end users tend to run Redmond's software on an increasing number of devices. So if you double the number of devices but only increase the price 15 percent, you're getting a bargain, right? I reckon -- only if you are, in fact, using the software on more and  more devices. If not, you are getting whacked with a pretty steep price hike.

User CALs, which offer multiple device use, can be a bargain compared to buying licenses for all your machines. Deciding between these User CALs and Device CALs (which are limited to the device) is complex.

My advice? Take a close look at usage patterns, get your accountant involved and strike the best deal.

How do you approach all this? Let me know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 11/29/2012 at 1:19 PM


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