Barney's Blog

Blog archive

IE 10 'Do Not Track' Tracked in D.C.

Even when Microsoft does good it gets knocked around. Take Do Not Track (DNT). This does as it says if data brokers comply. The W3C Web standard will make it so your clickstream data isn't collected by data-hungry Web marketers who love to use it against you. Oh, and this data gets passed around more than playing cards at a Penn & Teller show.

Microsoft thought it was doing a good thing when it decided it (DNT) should be a default setting in IE 10. I mean, how much trouble do we all get into when we neglect to do something we probably should and don't know we can do?

For some reason the W3C thinks we should all opt-in to Do Not Track as if everyone understands the concept of clickstream data. A little optimistic, no?

So who's giving Redmond this hard time? The U.S. government

The spec, which like most Web specs is almost never really done, was the subject of a meeting of the Congressional Bi-Partisan Privacy Caucus (and it was a fan of Microsoft's default ways).

The FTC fought Microsoft on antitrust grounds in the '90s. Now, at least one Commissioner doesn't like Microsoft deciding on what is best for consumers when it comes to Do Not Track.

But just as you can opt-in, can't you opt-out FTC?

Whose side are you on? Cast your vote at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 06/25/2012 at 1:19 PM


Featured

  • Microsoft Shifting Away from Office 365 Brand Name in April

    Microsoft on Monday announced coming product naming changes, where "Office 365" is mostly getting replaced by the "Microsoft 365" brand.

  • Microsoft Grows Services Amid COVID-19

    Microsoft in a Saturday announcement recapped how its services have been affected by "shelter-in-place" governmental mandates in the last week, providing details on growth stats and prioritizations.

  • Microsoft Adds 6 More Months to Expiring Certification Programs

    Microsoft has announced an extension to the end date of three certification programs slated for retirement.

  • Microsoft's Surface Pro X: It's Like the Surface RT, But Better

    There's a lot about the Surface Pro X that's reminiscent of the ill-fated Surface RT. But despite the similarities, this might just be one of the rare cases where the sequel is better than the original.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.