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Doug's Mailbag: Ditching the Start Button

Readers sound off on the idea of Windows 8 not having the Start button:

There is no Start button. Period. But, the same features are found on the Metro Interface. Do you need another Start button? I do not think so. But, this OS does take some time to get used to, and I still have not gotten used to it. Some type of guide would have been nice for the beta test.
-Anonymous

Apart from the Metro UI being one big start button it also has a number of features that make it really easy to find stuff. Just start typing and it will narrow down your application search in real time. You can right click near the bottom of the screen and it will bring up a menu with all apps. Click on that and your apps will be grouped. Click the magnifying glass and it will show a summarized view of your apps. There is probably heaps more of this stuff to be found.
-Gary

Tell me how quickly a new user will be able to open a command prompt. Took me about 15 minutes of pure frustration to get to it.
-Austin

Share your thoughts with the editors of this newsletter! Write to dbarney@redmondmag.com. Letters printed in this newsletter may be edited for length and clarity, and will be credited by first name only (we do NOT print last names or e-mail addresses).

 

Posted by Doug Barney on 04/04/2012 at 1:19 PM


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