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Black Day for Privacy

Most of my cars are old -- and I plan to keep it that way. My VW camper is a '72, my 928 is from 1980 and the Land Cruiser shipped from Japan my junior year of high school is from 1978. The rig that gets the most miles is either the '95 Bronco with more rust than a Bering Sea wreck or a '95 Cadillac sedan.

Despite the high cost of gas, it looks like I'm going to have to keep these crates running. That because in a few years our precious government may well mandate that all our new cars have black boxes that will tell exactly what we were doing when an incident occurred. If you want this intrusion out of your own car, you just broke the law!

It always starts relatively small. But something like this can grow. With GPS and wireless there is the ability to not just track and spy, but to control your vehicle. And once you give up power can you ever really get it back?

The best thing about most of these old cars? There are no expensive power windows fixes and I can still actually find (and replace) the alternator.

What is your favorite old car and what should the government, car companies and insurance firms do with these shiny black boxes? Answers always welcome and shared at [email protected]

Posted by Doug Barney on 04/23/2012 at 1:19 PM


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