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4 Million Cloud Jobs by 2015?

The cloud is supposed to bring efficiencies to computing that, at times, can also mean efficiencies in the IT personnel needed to launch and drive cloud initiatives. In short, the cloud can seem like a job killer. At least that's the general perception among many of our Redmond readers. Popular perception often trumps facts and figures, even with good evidence to the contrary in the form of an IDC report -- albeit, commissioned by Microsoft -- that shows cloud computing will effectively create about 14 million jobs in the next three years.

The study show that a third of cloud -based hiring will form around mainly communications and media, banking, and manufacturing; also, half of all cloud-related jobs will originate in emerging markets (mainly China and India). IDC derived the data from forecasts it made from cloud spending trends globally.

Is the cloud having an effect on hiring where you are, or have you hired or plan to hire based on some cloud initiatives?  Let Doug know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.
-By Michael Domingo

Posted by Michael Domingo on 03/07/2012 at 1:19 PM


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