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I Want To Fail Like Microsoft

For some reason, this week was 'Beat on Microsoft' week. Stories went around that the Microsoft brand was dying, the PC was dying and that Microsoft has missed every important innovation in the last five years. Oh, and Ray Ozzie left.

Hey, Microsoft is far from perfect, but from a macro level, the company is doing pretty dang good.

All these stories came out before Redmond released its latest financials (there were even some snarky pieces predicting a bad quarter).

As a long-time Microsoft follower I know better. In my gut I just knew that Microsoft would have a blow-out quarter and I was right. This company sets more records than Michael Phelps.

This past quarter revenue jumped an astounding 25 percent over last year's, to over $16 billion. If my high school math is correct, that's a run rate of over $64 billion, without accounting for future growth.

Is Redmond challenged? Sure it is. But in my view, if Microsoft is going to really blow it, it will take years to show -- they have that much inertia.

Am I all wet? Share your prognostications at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 10/29/2010 at 1:18 PM


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