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Microsoft To Fold Its Management Summit into TechEd 2014

Microsoft announced today that it plans to merge its Microsoft Management Summit (MMS) event into its TechEd event next year.

The move, which will bring MMS content into TechEd 2014, isn't a cost-cutting measure, according a statement by Brad Anderson, corporate vice president of Windows Server and System Center. Instead, its aim is to broaden IT pro access to various management experts, he contended.

The deep content from the MMS events, typically at levels 300 and 400, will be part of TechEd 2014, which is scheduled for May 12 to 15, 2014 in Houston. TechEd 2014 also will include some familiar MMS features, such as labs conducted by dedicated management instructors as well as management "Meet & Geek opportunities," Anderson indicated.

Anderson described the change as "a big transition." TechEd has traditionally been viewed as Microsoft's educational event that accommodates varying skill levels, while MMS was the more heavily technical event for IT pros. While cost wasn't the reason for Microsoft folding MMS into TechEd, according to Anderson, he did admit that the content between the two events had become "very similar."

TechEd 2014 registration opens on Nov. 5, 2013. Microsoft will have early-bird registration ($1,895) open before Dec. 31, 2013, but the cost goes up after that date to $2,195.

About the Author

Kurt Mackie is senior news producer for 1105 Media's Converge360 group.

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