News

Google Points to China Again in Gmail Hack

According to Google, Jinan, China-based hackers accessed hundreds of users, including U.S. government officials, military personnel, journalists, Chinese political activists and officials of several Asian countries, most of them in South Korea.

In a post on the Google blog, the company said the hackers likely used phishing tactics to get users to give up their passwords with the intent of monitoring their e-mail messages. The attackers also apparently changed users' forwarding and deletion settings, Google said. Gmail lets users forward e-mail messages automatically and give other users access to the account.

The Washington Post, quoting a U.S. government official with knowledge of the attack, said the account of one Cabinet official was among those hacked.

The hackers gained access to a large amount of content, the Post reported, although the attack was limited to personal accounts; no official government accounts were breached. The FBI was notified of the attack last week. The Chinese government denied any involvement, calling Google's claims a "fabrication," the Washington Post reported.

Google said it disrupted the attack, notified the affected users and secured their accounts.

The targeted attack continues a trend toward under-the-radar attacks that successfully use phishing and other tactics to gain access to user accounts and network systems. The intent isn't to disrupt systems, but to quietly infiltrate them and gather information.

Similar attacks, often called Advanced Persistent Threats, have been used in recent high-profile breaches, such as those at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and RSA Security.

In March attackers gained access to information about RSA Security's SecurID authentication tokens, which subsequently were used in recent breaches of defense contractors Lockheed Martin and L3 Communications.

Google said the Gmail hack didn't disrupt its internal systems and contended that the problem wasn't with Gmail's security. Its blog post urged users to improve their approach to security, offering seven steps they could take, including using two-step verification, strong passwords used only with Gmail, and using Gmail features to monitor for their accounts for suspicious forwarding, delegated accounts and other activity.

About the Author

Kevin McCaney is the managing editor of Government Computer News.

Featured

  • Microsoft Ups Its Windows 10 App Compatibility Assurances

    Microsoft gave assurances this week that organizations adopting Windows 10 likely won't face application compatibility issues.

  • SharePoint Online Users To Get 'Modern' UI Push in April

    Microsoft plans to alter some of the tenant-level blocking capabilities that may have been set up by organizations and deliver its so-called "modern" user interface (UI) to Lists and Libraries for SharePoint Online users, starting in April.

  • How To Use PowerShell Splatting

    Despite its weird name, splatting can be a really handy technique if you create a lot of PowerShell scripts.

  • New Microsoft Customer Agreement for Buying Azure Services To Start in March

    Microsoft will have a new approach for organizations buying Azure services called the "Microsoft Customer Agreement," which will be available for some customers starting as early as this March.

comments powered by Disqus
Most   Popular

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.