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Friday IT Fun: Evolution of PC Audio, Apple Will Own Your Life

As long as the Internet is still in business, than this column will continue. If you've found something you think other IT pros will appreciate, send an e-mail to [email protected] so we can include it in next week's edition.

  • Evolution of PC Audio (YouTube.com) – Who misses the days of upgrading your sound card every six months for more than $100 a piece?

  • What It's Like To Own an Apple Product(TheOatmeal.com) – We suggest a cheaper hobby -- like crack. (Disclaimer: Please ignore our suggestion.)  

  • 70 Amazing Futuristic and Crazy Computer Cases(Gobossy.com) – With the level of ingenuity, creativity and skill on display here, how is it we can't plug a single hole in the ocean?

  • How To Hack a Computer in an Action Movie (CollegeHumor.com) – And there will always be someone on the other side yelling, "They're breaking through our firewall!"

  • Lost Wars (Cracked.com) – What happens when you take two nerdy pop culture licenses and combine them? You get a Lost ending that still makes more sense than the actual one.   

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the site producer for Redmondmag.com and MCPmag.com.

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