Time To Patch, You're Already a Day Late!

Yesterday was Patch Tuesday, and my apologies for not giving you a head's up. If you haven't already, take a look at the fixes Redmond was kind enough to provide. Excel, Outlook and Windows all got critical flaws fixed. Get the deets here.

Macworld: Big on Consumer, Light on Enterprise
At Macworld, Steve Jobs announced a cool (but expensive) cell phone and a device that lets you play your computer video on your TV (this is not an original idea, but my guess is that Apple will just do it better).

Unfortunately, Apple is missing out on a huge opportunity to start pushing Mac back into corporations. Anyone in Cupertino listening?

Teflon Steve
Steve Jobs spent the holiday season prepping his Macworld speech and fighting off charges that he and the Apple board of directors played it fast and loose with stock options. Jobs ducked the charges (it was, after all, an Apple investigation, sorta like Al Franken looking into Hillary Clinton's campaign finances), and I'm glad.

Even if he was found guilty, I'd pull a Gerry Ford and pardon the poor guy. Let's face it: Steve Jobs is good for America, and even better for Microsoft. When Jobs was forced out of Apple by John Scully, the company lost its vision and stalled.

When the prodigal son returned, Apple was reborn. My only gripe is that Jobs killed off the Mac clones (imagine if Dell, HP, IBM and Gateway all made Macs).

I don't care if Steve Jobs stole my kid's lunch money -- we still need a strong Apple to balance the scales and keep Gates & Crew on its toes!

Gates Foundation Cheap Shot or Deserved Blow?
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation had gotten a free ride from the press: How can you knock a guy who's giving away some 90 percent of his money? Now, investigative journalists are looking at the harm some of the foundation's projects are doing.

Besides fighting disease, the foundation is funding power plants, which can pollute and cause respiratory disease.

In fact, the foundation has been investing in lots of energy companies to earn more money to pay for vaccines and research.

And therein lies the contradiction.

Energy companies are not known for their environmental contributions. But should the Gates foundation shy away from what could otherwise be a good investment? Just where is the greater good?

Would it be better for the foundation to invest in solar power and fuel cells? Sure -- as long as it gets just as good a return as drilling for oil. Tell me where I'm wrong at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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