SOA: These Three Letters Now Officially Endorsed in Redmond

I've been pretty interested in Service-Oriented Architectures (SOA) for a while, but the deeper I looked, the less I saw Microsoft using the term. Instead of "SOA," everything was "Web Services" or "Windows Live." Don't believe me? A search of Microsoft.com reveals 6,019 instances of the term "SOA." Sounds impressive, until you realize there are 351,162 results for "Web Services." You do the math.

I know these are two somewhat different concepts, and many of the folks at Microsoft agree -- except for them, "Web Services" has relevance while "SOA" doesn't.

But more and more Redmond folks are getting it. The company even put on an SOA conference last week that promoted the concept, especially from Microsoft's standpoint. Do you care about SOA? Let me know at dbarney@redmondmag.com or comment below.

Cheap Windows Math
Windows XP Starter Edition is a cool idea. This less expensive version of Windows with fewer features is designed to make it easier for those in poor countries to afford a personal computer. I think it should be available worldwide. Like there aren't poor folks in the United States, Canada, Italy or Germany? (Maybe they should keep it out of Luxembourg and Monaco.)

Over a million copies have been sold, which led an overzealous Microsoft PR type to write this headline: "Windows XP Starter Edition Milestone: Helping Millions Cross the Digital Divide." Maybe the math is right; maybe that many people cluster around each individual PC. There's one trying to create a document, another watching and a third explaining how to hit ctrl-alt-del all at once!

Storage Virtualization Hits New Low – Price, That Is

DataCore is making it cheaper to give storage virtualization a whirl. For a cool grand, you can see what it's like to treat your hard drives with the same flexibility that some of you now treat your virtual servers and PCs. And unlike storage virtualization of the past, this one doesn't require Fibre Channel, which almost no one in IT understands.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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