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Courtois to Head Microsoft's International Efforts

Microsoft named its top European executive, Jean-Philippe Courtois, to a newly created position of Microsoft International president, in which he will lead international sales, marketing and services.

Courtois, formerly chief executive officer of Microsoft Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), assumes the new position as Microsoft's future growth increasingly depends on the company's ability to sell internationally in the face of competition from the cheaper alternatives of Linux and pirated copies of Windows.

The new role adds Japan, China, the Asia Pacific region, Latin America, public sector and emerging markets to Courtois' previous responsibilities.

Courtois continues to report to Kevin Johnson, group vice president of Worldwide Sales, Marketing and Services at Microsoft. Courtois will remain in Paris.

Microsoft also promoted Neil Holloway to president of Microsoft EMEA from his former post as corporate vice president of sales, marketing and services for EMEA. He will continue to report to Courtois.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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