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64-bit Webcast Week at Microsoft

Microsoft is holding a series of IT administrator-focused Webcasts this week on the transition to 64-bit Windows computing.

"The shift to mainstream 64-bit computing is underway, and Microsoft wants to help you gear up for this important milestone in our industry," the company said on its page listing the Webcasts.

Microsoft has 64-bit support for Intel Itanium 2 processors in Windows Server 2003, Windows XP and SQL Server 2000. The company is currently building versions of Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, SQL Server 2005, Visual Studio 2005 and the .NET Framework 2.0 that will support the 64-bit extensions to the x86 instruction set. AMD supports x86-64 in its Opteron and Athlon 64 processors. Intel is building in support for the extensions in newer Xeon processors.

Microsoft's Webcast topics include running existing 32-bit code without modification on 64-bit Windows, writing native 64-bit code, details of next-generation development tools and details of 64-bit processor architectures.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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