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Intel Makes Broad Cuts to Processor Prices

Intel announced price cuts of as much as nearly 35 percent this week that cut across seven of its processor lines and encompassed 28 individual processor models.

The line of Pentium 4 processors supporting Hyper-Threading saw the broadest cuts, with 11 different models affected. The biggest cut came on the top-of-the-line 560, which is a 3.60-GHz processor with 1 MB of L2 cache and an 800-MHz front-side bus. The price dropped 34.54 percent from $637 to $417. Price cuts for the other 10 models ranged from 18.35 percent to 33.33 percent.

Deep cuts were also unveiled for two models of the Pentium 4 line that supports Intel's Extended Memory 64 Technology, Intel's answer to the AMD64 platform. A 3.60-MHz version dropped 34.54 percent from $637 to $417, and a 3.40-MHz version dropped 33.33 percent from $417 to $278.

Intel's flagship line of 64-bit processors, the Itanium 2, also came in for some lower prices. While the top-of-the-line, 1.5-GHz model with 6 MB of cache remained unchanged at $4,227, five other models were marked down. The biggest drop was from $1,338 to $910, or 31.99 percent, for the 1.30-GHz model with 3 MB of cache.

Other four processor lines with lower prices were the Intel Celeron and Celeron D and the Mobile Intel Pentium 4 with and without support for Hyper-Threading.

All prices are for 1,000-unit quantities.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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