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Executive Software Updates Undelete Utility

Executive Software on Thursday released a refreshed version of its Undelete utility for recovering accidentally deleted files with a new feature that allows users to find their own files on the server without having to bother the IT department.

Undelete 4.0 is the latest version of Executive Software's tool for recovering files on a workstation or on a server that have been accidentally deleted and may have even bypassed the Recycle Bin.

With the 4.0 version, users can directly access the Undelete utility on the server to view their own data and recover their own accidentally or unintentionally deleted files. According to Executive Software, the utility's interface presents the user with only the files he had access to rather than forcing him to slog through all the files on the server or allowing unauthorized access to sensitive files. The company says special configuration is not required to enable the customized view.

George Goodrich, Undelete product line manager at Executive Software, positions the product as "part of a multi-layered approach to data protection" along with backup and other tools. Undelete Professional lists for $39.95 for Workstation or $299.95 for a Server version. The company also makes a Home edition that lists for $29.95.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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