A Fast Intro to .NET

Sorting out the story from Redmond

Unlike most technologies that come from Redmond, .NET wasn’t clearly defined. Nigel meets the challenge head on and takes the reader through eleven chapters in an attempt to explain .NET.

Through the use of text, images code samples, he helps the reader understand the topic a little better. He does an excellent job of explaining each of the various products, helping the reader understand what role the product plays in the .NET world as well as providing an understanding of how it integrates with other .NET products or technologies

At only 206 pages—index included—the book is a lightweight for certain on page size but lives up to its title as a Jumpstart. For any IT professional, developer or Network Administrator, the book will provide you with a good understanding of what .NET is. If you’re not sure whether you need .NET, this book will provide the answers to help guide your decision.

About the Author

Gerry O'Brien, MCSE, MCSD, MCDBA, MCT, has been working with computers since the days of the Commodore VIC-20. Over the past five years he's done network administration for The Hardman Group Ltd., a real estate management/development company, and owns Canadian-Based GK ComputerConsulting, which provides hardware and software sales, consulting, and development services to a wide range of clients.

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