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Microsoft Names Chief Privacy Strategist

Microsoft has gone outside the company to fill the position of chief privacy strategist.

Peter Cullen, the corporate privacy officer for Royal Bank of Canada, will join Microsoft on July 14. He will report to Scott Charney, chief Trustworthy Computing strategist.

“Peter Cullen has the experience to drive Microsoft’s commitment to privacy protections to the next level,” said Charney, whose title recently changed from chief security strategist.

Charney, a former FBI agent who publicly says he views his own responsibility as a cost to Microsoft for doing business as opposed to generating profits, vowed that Cullen will be “an effective advocate for strong and innovative consumer privacy safeguards.”

Cullen’s credentials include a role in developing best practices for the financial industry around the collection and use of customer information, creating a Corporate Privacy Group at Royal Bank of Canada and helping found two networks of chief privacy officers.

The chief privacy strategist position at Microsoft was last held by Richard Purcell, who left Microsoft earlier this year.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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