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Apache Flaw Affects Windows Implementations

A security company released information this week about what it calls an "extremely high risk" vulnerability involving the Apache open source Web server running on non-Unix platforms, such as Windows.

The vulnerability affects Apache 2.0 Server Software, according to its discoverers at PivX Solutions of Newport Beach, Calif. The vulnerability could allow attackers to damage a server and reveal sensitive data, according to the security company.

The flaw affects default installations of the Apache Web server in non-Unix platforms like Windows, IBM OS/2 and Novell Netware. The flaw does not appear to affect Unix or Linux platforms.

PivX notified the Apache Software Foundation, which maintains the open source Apache code, and the foundation produced a fixed version within 24 hours. The vulnerability and several other less serious security holes are patched in Apache 2.0.40.

Meanwhile, PivX also has a workaround for users, which is available at www.pivx.com.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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