News

Company Extends Apache to Support .NET

Not all the Microsoft-related talk at this week's O'Reilly Open Source Convention involved Redmond bashing.

Covalent Technologies, a company that sells an enterprise Web server built on top of Apache 2.0, revealed that it has developed extensions to its Apache Web server that allows integration with Microsoft's ASP.NET, a major part of Microsoft's .NET Framework for Web services.

John Jack, Covalent president and CEO, says the company wants to provide choice to customers who may like the .NET approach instead of the J2EE approach to Web services, but want Apache instead of Microsoft IIS as the Web server.

"We focus on operational excellence at the Web server layer, and thus want to empower our customers to choose the Web services development platform of their choice. Obviously Microsoft is a clear leader in this technology segment and we will continue to work with them to support ASP.NET, and Windows 2000," Jack said.

Covalent's mod_asp.net extensions work with its Covalent Enterprise Ready Server (ERS). When Covalent launched ERS 2.1 back in May, the company called it "the first Apache Web server product optimized for the Windows operating system" and built its marketing campaign on that claim. ERS 2.1, which costs $1,495 per CPU also runs on Solaris, Linux and HP-UX.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

Featured

  • Microsoft Resumes Rerelease of Windows 10 Version 1809

    Microsoft on Wednesday once more resumed its general rollout of the Windows 10 version 1809 upgrade, also known as the "October 2018 Update."

  • Microsoft Ups Its Windows 10 App Compatibility Assurances

    Microsoft gave assurances this week that organizations adopting Windows 10 likely won't face application compatibility issues.

  • SharePoint Online Users To Get 'Modern' UI Push in April

    Microsoft plans to alter some of the tenant-level blocking capabilities that may have been set up by organizations and deliver its so-called "modern" user interface (UI) to Lists and Libraries for SharePoint Online users, starting in April.

  • How To Use PowerShell Splatting

    Despite its weird name, splatting can be a really handy technique if you create a lot of PowerShell scripts.

comments powered by Disqus
Most   Popular

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.