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Microsoft Distributes Post-Beta 3 Version of Windows .NET Server

NEW ORLEANS -- Microsoft passed out an interim build of Windows .NET Standard Server beta code to attendees of its Microsoft TechEd 2002 conference last week.

The CD, stamped "Post-Beta 3," comes about five months after the Beta 3 release of the Windows .NET Server family of operating systems.

The build, No. 3604, which was several weeks old as of the TechEd conference, represents a compromise for Microsoft. The company normally doesn't do widespread releases of code beyond its own beta testing community except on standard pre-release milestones, such as Beta 2, Beta 3 and Release Candidates.

However, TechEd is an opportunity for Microsoft to reach some of its most loyal developers, who are working on next-generation applications and may be enticed to take advantage of new operating system features. The U.S. conference attracted about 8,000 attendees, and Microsoft claimed tens of thousands more attended in other locations worldwide.

With the Trustworthy Computing-related code review, or normal Microsoft product development delays depending on how you look at it, Microsoft has slipped off earlier schedules that might have brought a more formal milestone release of the operating system at TechEd.

The CD is a time-limited release.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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