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Microsoft Certified Systems Expert?

If you 're not an engineer, you want to be an expert. That 's what the results of a recent MCP Magazine survey say.

Due to the growing complications of using the word "Engineer" in the title Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer [see News in the July issue], we asked for your take on the naming controversy. In a month-long survey at www.mcpmag.com, respondents voted on alternatives to the word Engineer. Among the choices: Administrator, Analyst, Architect, Builder, Consultant, Expert, Guru, Implementer, Integrator, Manager, Practice Manager, Professional, Specialist and Technologist.

Of 2,017 responses, 526 of you said, "Don 't change the name at all." Of the 1,320 who said that only the word Engineer should change, the overwhelming majority--502 respondents--liked "Expert " as a replacement. This alteration has the added bonus of not changing the MCSE acronym.

Your second choice was "Administrator," with 207 votes. The only other name to garner triple-digit support was Specialist, with 168 votes. Of the low vote-getters, Practice Manager had two supporters, Builder had four votes, and Manager had nine. The only name without a single vote? Implementer.

Other vote totals: Professional: 90, Analyst: 82, Architect: 65, Consultant: 41, Technologist: 36, Guru: 12.

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