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Pricing Unveiled with Content Management Server Launch

Microsoft Corp. unveiled pricing for its Content Management Server 2001 this week in announcing the general availability of the product.

Content Management Server is the most expensive by processor of the .NET Enterprise Servers, although outlays for some of Microsoft's other enterprise servers could easily come to more with Client Access Licenses and other costs.

Microsoft will charge $39,901 per CPU for its new content management system, a rebadged version of the NCompass Resolution 4.0 product released in March by NCompass Labs Inc. Microsoft acquired that company in May.

NCompass built its content management system using COM and tight integration with Microsoft Commerce Server 2000 and SQL Server 2000 was a major feature of its 4.0 release.

The pricing for the content management system is competitive with other content management systems on the market from companies like Vignette, Eprise and others.

It is a jump from the sticker price of most of the other .NET Enterprise Servers. The closest in per CPU prices are BizTalk Server 2000 Enterprise Edition at $25,000 and SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition at $20,000.

Microsoft also announced three editions for Content Management Server 2001. They are the Enterprise Edition, a 120-day Evaluation Edition and the Developer Edition, available through the Microsoft Developer Network.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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