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Washington Considers IT Training Tax Credit

A bill was introduced in the House of Representatives in May that would offer individuals and employers up to $2,000 in tax credits for IT training expenses.

A bill was introduced in the House of Representatives in May that would offer individuals and employers up to $2,000 in tax credits for IT training expenses. Called the Technology Education & Training Act (TETA), or H.R. 1769, the bill is similar to S. 762 introduced in the Senate earlier in the month. According to the Technology Workforce Coalition, an organization lobbying for the legislation, the goal of the act is to ease the IT worker shortage by upping the number of trained IT professionals.

According to the TWC, the Act provides a tax credit of up to $1,500 for IT training expenses paid by employers. It also would amend the HOPE and Lifetime Learning tax credits so that individuals can better access IT training courses at all available institutions and training centers. And it would allow for tax credits of up to $2,000 for small businesses, as well as for people residing in and companies operating in empowerment zones and other qualified areas.

Reps. Jerry Weller (R-Ill.) and James Moran (D-Va.) and Sen. Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) introduced the bills. An effort at similar legislation last year withered in committee. Similar credits have been proposed—and passed—at the state level.

For more information about the TWC and this bill, visit www.techcoalition.org/tax_credit.htm.

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