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UPDATE:Canadian MCSEs Face Conundrum

Advice from Microsoft to Canadian MCSEs: Don't call yourself an engineer-unless you're licensed.

If you're an MCSE in Canada, don't call yourself an engineer-unless you're licensed. That's the advice being offered by Microsoft to certified professionals in that country. According to a letter sent out to its MCSEs, Microsoft says to "avoid using the full certification title and logo, and refrain from referring to yourself as an 'engineer.'" Its recommendation for now: to use only the acronym, MCSE.
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According to Microsoft, individuals face lawsuits by the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers. This is the same problem faced by MCSEs in states like Texas that require specific education and licensing of professionals who use the term "engineer" to describe their work.

There are no quick fixes to this dilemma. The challenge, according to Microsoft, is to come up with a term that fits the work done by MCSEs. The name needs to be localized worldwide and "not used in some other way that will be confusing," said Eckhart Böhme, a certification program manager. Microsoft has considered following suit with IBM and Cisco, both of which use "expert" in the name of their premier credentials. That would keep the acronym current. It's also debating the possibility of revamping the title altogether.

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