News

First Release of Content Management Server Slated for Q3

ATLANTA -- Microsoft Corp. plans to ship its first content management server in the third quarter, a company official told attendees at the TechEd 2001 developer show.

Content Management Server 2001 is the name of the product, which will be part of the .NET Enterprise Server family. Microsoft acquired the complete content management server earlier this year from NCompass Lab Inc., which had just issued version 4.0 of its Resolution product.

Microsoft will not make any changes to the functionality of Resolution in the initial release. "It's a straight rebrand," said Paul Flessner, senior vice president for .NET Enterprise Servers at Microsoft. "We wanted to get it on the market."

The delay from Microsoft's purchase of Resolution in March and its expected availability in Q3, stems from Microsoft's need to prepare the product for global markets, Flessner said. Microsoft continues to sell the content management server in the United States under the Resolution brand.

Unlike some better known content management systems on the market, Resolution is a COM-based server, making it a sensible fit for Microsoft. Ncompass' 4.0 version had also just added integration with Microsoft's Commerce Server 2000 and SQL Server 2000.

Two Content Management Server product managers demonstrated features of the server during Flessner's TechEd keynote Monday morning.

Highlights included the tool's ability to distinguish between a desktop Web browser and a PDA and render the page accordingly.

The pair also demonstrated the workflow capabilities of the server.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

Featured

  • Spaceflight Training in the Middle of a Pandemic

    Surprisingly, the worldwide COVID-19 lockdown has hardly slowed down the space training process for Brien. In fact, it has accelerated it.

  • Surface and ARM: Why Microsoft Shouldn't Follow Apple's Lead and Dump Intel

    Microsoft's current Surface flagship, the Surface Pro X, already runs on ARM. But as the ill-fated Surface RT showed, going all-in on ARM never did Microsoft many favors.

  • IT Security Isn't Supposed To Be Easy

    Joey explains why it's worth it to endure a little inconvenience for the long-term benefits of a password manager and multifactor authentication.

  • Microsoft Makes It Easier To Self-Provision PCs via Windows Autopilot When VPNs Are Used

    Microsoft announced this week that the Windows Autopilot service used with Microsoft Intune now supports enrolling devices, even in cases where virtual private networks (VPNs) might get in the way.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.