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Microsoft Acquires Content Management Server

The .NET Enterprise Server family grew by one this week as Microsoft Corp. acquired a content management system.

Microsoft bought NCompass Labs Inc., developer of NCompass Resolution. The purchase is a logical fit for Microsoft as NCompass built its Web content management system from the ground up using COM and other Microsoft technologies.

Many of the highest profile content management systems on the market are Java based.

Microsoft will re-brand the product as Microsoft Content Management Server 2001 this fall. Microsoft pledges continued product support and updates to customers who buy the current product, NCompass Resolution 4.0, released in March.

The announcement follows a recent report from the Yankee Group predicting that sales of content management software will grow to $3 billion in 2004 from the $900 million in sales in 2000.

NCompass already integrates with Commerce Server 2000 for online business creation and SQL Server 2000 for content storage and search capabilities.

The current lineup of .NET Enterprise Servers consists of Application Center, BizTalk Server, Commerce Server, Exchange Server, Host Integration Server, Internet Security and Acceleration Server and SQL Server. Mobile Information Server has yet to be released.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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