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Microsoft Previews BizTalk RosettaNet Accelerator

Microsoft Corp. worked to spur participation in the burgeoning RosettaNet and simultaneously drum up some business for BizTalk Server.

The company unveiled a BizTalk Server Accelerator for RosettaNet Wednesday at the RosettaNet Partner Conference in Anaheim, Calif.

The accelerator is supposed to be available this summer. Pricing hasn't been finalized, although BizTalk goes for $5,000/processor ($25,000/processor for the enterprise edition).

RosettaNet was founded with 40 companies in June 1998 to come up with a common language and standard processes for IT and high-tech companies to create and improve digital supply chains.

Business efficiency was a motivator, but a successful RosettaNet program is also good PR for getting non-technology sectors to buy all the infrastructure required to start building e-business exchanges and supply chains.

Membership has increased tenfold to about 400 organizations in IT, electronic components and semiconductor manufacturing.

The consortium is focused on XML, which is also BizTalk's foundation.

Microsoft's accelerator includes a RosettaNet Implementation Framework 1.1 parser, a collection of prebuilt Partner Interface Processes (PIP), tools for building PIPs, a PIP unit tester and extensive documentation.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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