News

Cryptologists Allege Flaw in PGP

Cryptologists in Prague say they found a flaw in PGP, the most common encryption algorithm for securing e-mail messages, according to a report today by the New York Times.

U.S. security experts could not judge the seriousness of the flaw in PGP, or Pretty Good Privacy, until the technical details become available, the Times reported.

It appears that anyone who wanted to break the PGP encryption using the vulnerability would need access to the sender’s computer, according to the Times.

An IT firm in Prague called ICZ says its cryptologists found the flaw while doing research on secure communications for the Czech government.

Network Associates licenses PGP. Mark McArdle, vice president of PGP engineering at Network Associates, told the Times he had learned of the claim on Tuesday and had a team of engineers investigating it. –

ICZ’s statement on the issue can be found at http://www.i.cz/en/onas/tisk4.html

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

Featured

  • Microsoft Starting To Roll Out New Excel Connected Data Types

    Microsoft on Thursday announced some Excel and Power BI enhancements that add "connected data types" on top of the standard strings and numbers options.

  • Windows 10 Users Getting New Process for Finding Optional Driver Updates

    Accessing Windows 10 drivers classified as "optional updates" will be more of a manual seek-and-install type of experience, starting on Nov. 5, 2020, Microsoft explained in a Wednesday announcement.

  • Microsoft Changes Privacy Platform Name to SmartNoise

    Microsoft Research has changed the name of its "differential privacy" platform from "WhiteNoise" to "SmartNoise," according to a Wednesday announcement.

  • Why Restarting a Failed SCVMM Job Might Be a Bad Idea

    Occasionally, restarting a failed System Center Virtual Machine Manager job can leave your virtualization infrastructure in an unknown state. Here's how to avoid that.

comments powered by Disqus