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‘Naked Wife’ Worm Latest Virus to Hit

A new e-mail-borne worm masquerading as "Naked Wife" has begun making its way through some U.S. corporations. If executed, the worm, which was first reported on Tuesday, can delete Windows directory files and also destroy PCs.

"We have received several reports, about 30 or 40 so far," says Mike Donnelly, support consultant at Sophos Anti-Virus. "It deletes a number of files from the Windows directory and sub-directories of the Windows directory."

The email shows up in a user's inbox with the subject headline 'Fw: My Naked Wife.' It's message body reads 'My wife never looked like that!' and contains a Nakedwife.exe attachment.

Once opened, the worm spreads by emailing itself to address listed in the user's Microsoft Outlook address book. When the attachment is run it imitates a video player and displays an image to fool the user into believing that a video is loading.

Although it has not had a major impact on U.S. corporations so far, Donnelly says the worm is still dangerous because it's a worm that deletes systems files.

"It could destroy PCs by deleting the systems files," he says. "But right now it's just a typical worm with a simple text subject that catches the user's eye." – Jim Martin

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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