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Windows XP/Whistler Server Exams to be Integrated into Win2K MCSE Track

Microsoft confirms development of Windows XP and Whistler Server exams, which will be integrated into Windows 2000 MCSE track.

Microsoft confirmed today that it would release Windows XP- and Whistler Server-related exams that will follow on the heels of releases of Windows XP and Whistler software later this year. Microsoft also says the Windows XP/Whistler Server exams will be integrated into the Windows 2000 MCSE track.

Kahlin Kurilik, a representative with Microsoft's press relations firm Waggener Edstrom, said that Microsoft released details to squelch rumors about the quick obsolescence of the Windows 2000 track.

"Many current MCSEs certified on NT have been speculating on the possibility of having to upgrade with the release of the new operating system," said Kurilik. He declined to comment further or provide details about the new exams. Microsoft would have typically waited until it formulated more details on the exams before releasing any announcement, he said, but the company felt compelled to comment earlier "to ensure the MCSE community they would not have to upgrade their certifications with the release of Windows XP."

Microsoft hasn't been forthcoming with details other than those furnished in its MCSE FAQ, which was updated earlier today (to read it, go to http://www.microsoft.com/trainingandservices/default.asp?PageID=mcp&PageCall=faq&SubSite=cert/mcse&AnnMenu=mcse#3title). According to the FAQ, Microsoft recommends that candidates who are currently taking steps to upgrade to the Windows 2000 MCSE should continue to do so, because Windows XP/Whistler Server exams will not be available until after the prescribed upgrade deadline.

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