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Windows 8 Failing To Excite Business

Windows 8 is as big of a question mark as predicting next year's Superbowl winner. I've gotten feedback from close to 100 Redmond Report readers and the reviews are decidedly mixed. It's like that biker with love and hate tattooed across both sets of knuckles. Michael Miller, whom I worked with when he was editor-in-chief of InfoWorld, found much the same thing.

A survey by Forrester also backs both our anecdotal findings.

Past Windows upgrades, with the exception of Vista, were no brainers -- the only question was how long it would take.

Windows 8 is different because, well Windows 8 is very different and very disruptive. And that gives business great pause, making the adoption slow, Forrester believes.

Forrester surveyed users prior to Windows 7 release and found about half at that time planned to upgrade. This time around less than a quarter have that affection for Windows 8.

There are two areas of confusion: First, Win 8 has the two interfaces, the tablet look and feel and old-style Windows. And there are two sets of hardware: Intel and ARM.

Another problem is that many shops are still moving from XP to the tried-and-true Windows 7.

What are your Windows 8 plans? Share with all of us by writing dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 11/28/2012 at 1:19 PM


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Reader Comments:

Thu, Nov 29, 2012 Chris FL

We are using Windows 8 for only tablet devices if users need them. Otherwise it's Windows 7 on the desktops. I have one client who wanted Win8 on their "normal" hp laptop so we did do that one.

Thu, Nov 29, 2012 Dan Iowa

"Windows 8 has 2 interfaces." - Wrong! It has one. It's slightly different from Windows 7, but not by much. Those who are talking about replacing the metro interface are proof of this. If you can add a Start8 application to provide a start menu on the desktop, and not really notice much difference, how different can it really be. I for one, like the start screen of Windows 8 better than the start menu. It is much less cluttered, and I can add/remove all my commonly used apps, still get the benefit of live tiles, and for anything less frequently used, I just start typing what I want to do and it shows up. Granted there's more to Windows 8 than the start screen, but all this silliness about that part of it seems more based on ignorance than anything else. Clearly there is an education issue, but let's face it. A single web page that all your users can view would address this with maybe 5-15 minutes time spent by each user to look at the web page.

Wed, Nov 28, 2012

We are considering migrating from WinXP to Win8 without the use of the metro\modern interface. Applications like Start8 adds the traditional start menu back and aside from a few differences, it is hard to tell you are not on a Windows 7 system. We will continue to test to see if this is a viable option.

Wed, Nov 28, 2012 MIKE SAN DIEGO

Win 8 has 2 interfaces. If one looks and does the same thing as Win 7 then we will consider. We don't care about tablet interface which is no good for serious business, and we don't need a radical change from the user friendly Win XP and 7 interfaces to Win 8. MS shouldn't mix business with pleasure, and they need to stay focus with each product separately. After all, most shops just slowly move to Win 7 then who has the funding to play with the new toy Win 8?

Wed, Nov 28, 2012 John Arizona

I have Win 8 enterprise running on my Macbook Pro in Parallels. Also installed Office 2013 Pro. Don't bother. Go with Win 7 and install Office 2011 on the Mac. Microsoft has screw the pooch again on Win 8.

Wed, Nov 28, 2012 John Arizona

The Federal Government (at least the branch I contract to) is not planning to go to Win 8 anytime soon...maybe skip it like Vista...

Wed, Nov 28, 2012

Strangely enough the only people at our office that want Windows 8 are Mac users who want it on Parallels.

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