Security Advisor

Change Your LinkedIn Passwords. Now.

A hacker who likes to brag on a Russian message board has said that he has disclosed almost 6.5 million passwords of users of the social media site. However, usernames of those stolen passwords were not found in the leaked document.

After looking into the incident, LinkedIn said this afternoon that the rumors were true.

"We can confirm that some of the passwords that were compromised correspond to LinkedIn accounts," wrote LinkedIn Director Vicente Silveira.

He said that the company is continuing to look into the matter, but in the mean time, those accounts affected have been temporarily closed and an e-mail sent to the user on how to change their passwords. Silveria also said that a recent update to LinkedIn's security protocol will help to avoid a situation like this in the future.

For those who didn't receive the e-mail and still have access to their LinkedIn account, it may be a good idea to go ahead and change that password anyway. Just in case.

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the site producer for Redmondmag.com and MCPmag.com.

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