Virtually Gone

In an effort to keep its next generation of virtualization from slipping further, Microsoft is delaying a raft of key features.

Viridian (which, besides being a codename, is a real word for the color blue/green) will lose the ability to move a virtual machine that's running to another box. Hot swapping is also getting the cold shoulder. I bet VMware engineers are breathing real sighs of relief.

Patent Storm Brewing
Fortune magazine has an extensive (read: long) report on Microsoft's strategy of using patents to squeeze money out of the free software community. Microsoft apparently has over 200 patents that are violated by the Linux kernel (isn't this based on the old Unix kernel?), OpenOffice (this one I can believe) and Linux GUIs (maybe Apple or PARC have a better case here).

The fear is that Microsoft can win licensing fees from the free software makers, making the software suddenly unfree!

I don't think the sky is falling here. Most open source has its legacy in software that predates Windows, and companies like IBM have plenty of patents to spit back at Redmond lawyers.

So I'm not terribly worried. They again, I run XP and Office -- not Linux and OpenOffice! What do you think? Does Microsoft have a case? Let me know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Longhorn Name Dropping
Here's a shocker: It seems that "Longhorn," cool as it sounds, will not be the name of the next Windows Server.

Brace yourselves! Longhorn will be called "Windows Server 2008."

Microsoft won't comment on the name, mistakenly posted on its Web site, but this is far from a surprise.

I think they are substituting a great name, Longhorn, for one as boring as an Al Gore press conference. What do you think? Let us know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

New 'Net Names Near
A little more than a year from now, ICANN is expected to release a bevy of new 'Net names. I'm not sure what new suffixes it'll approve, but suffice to say Web squatters will be snapping up the most common names and selling them to the highest bidder.

More Flash for Flash Cards
SanDisk is working with Microsoft on a new generation of flash drives that make it easier to take your computing environment with you.

Many smart IT folks long ago figured out how to bring their files and applications anywhere they go. In the old days, some even toted around hard drives and slapped them into PCs at remote offices or at home.

Flash drives make this much easier, and the U3 technology from SanDisk is supposed to add core application functionality such as e-mail and browsing to the drives. Maybe I can finally stop lugging my laptop wherever I go!

How do you deal with having multiple computers? Do you have a common set of data? Does anyone actually use Briefcase? I'm dying to know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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