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Half Off E-Learning Courses Until January

Microsoft offering many Windows 2003 and Exchange e-learning courses at discount for limited time.

Microsoft Corporation has discounted a handful of its E-Learning courses, but has stamped a due date on them. The company is offering courses for planning, designing, and managing Windows and Exchange servers for 50 percent off the regular price of $349 until January 15, 2005. Thereafter, courses will be available at regular price.

Although not all courses are aimed at providing MCPs with certification training, some courses do specify that some skills obtained in the process of completing a course can be used for exam preparation. Course 2274: Managing a Windows Server 2003 Environment (5), for example, has training that applies to Exam 70-290: Managing And Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment, and Course 2008: Designing an Exchange Server 2003 Organization - New Look & Feel! covers topics related to Exam 70-285, Designing a Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Organization, according to the course descriptions.

The Microsoft E-Learning courses can run from about 10 to 20 hours of delivered instruction for the average user and some courses require heftier computing processes because of inclusion of virtual labs for performing some of the exercises.

For more information or to try a sample course, go to https://www.microsoftelearning.com/ws03skills/itpro/special/.

About the Author

Michael Domingo has held several positions at 1105 Media, and is currently the editor in chief of Visual Studio Magazine.

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