Security Advisor

BYOD: The Security Headache

Not only does it not save enterprises money, but it adds a ton of security issues. What's not to like?

While hardware and software can get a bit pricey when adopting new tech across an entire enterprise, after the initial startup costs, only a small portion of the IT budget actually goes towards buying new stuff.

The majority of funds go towards maintenance, policy adoption, training and license renewal. That's why when the push for BYOD started, most IT pros that know how the real world works called BS on the supposed cost-saving benefits.

And that's exactly what your peers have said in a recent poll conducted by Lieberman Software. Not only does BYOD not save money (according to 67 percent of respondents), but being able to manage multiple devices running on multiple OSes make implementing comprehensive security protocols an absolute nightmare.

If it was as easy as throwing a one-size-fits-all security sheet over every device that connects to your corporate network, then BYOD would make sense. But that is not the case, and due to the juggling acts IT has to go through to secure these devices, 43 percent of respondents said that employees bringing their personal devices into the workplace increase the amount of virus infections.

And don't forget about the mess brought on by mobile connections. These machines spend the majority of time away from IT's watchful eye, and if lost or stolen (26 percent of respondents said this was their biggest fear concerning BYOD), unauthorized access could occur at any Starbucks where a phone, tablet or laptop is accidently left behind.

What are your thoughts on bringing personal devices into the workplace? Do they coincide with your company's policy? Share your thoughts with me at cpaoli@1105media.com.

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the site producer for Redmondmag.com and MCPmag.com.

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