Tech-Ed Take 2

Last week, I was in Orlando for Tech-Ed. So why am I flying back to Florida today? To go to Tech-Ed! You see, this year Microsoft split Tech-Ed into two weeks. Last week focused on developers, and because my company also runs Visual Studio Magazine, Redmond Developer News and ADTmag.com -- besides Redmond magazine -- I had to be there.

Last week was the last time (we believe) that Bill Gates will give a keynote presentation to developers. Having followed the man for some years, I somehow suspect that Bill will miss running Microsoft and will emerge in years to come with a far-less-than-retired role.

This week, Tech-Ed focuses on IT, and the next four issues of this newsletter will have a distinct Tech-Ed slant. So if you can't be sweltering in Disney, you can stay up to speed through Redmond Report.

Microsoft Opens Gates/Ballmer Kimono
Microsoft has one of the best Web sites for journalists in PressPass. In it are links to press releases, Q&As, photos and whatnot. It also links to articles from outside publications.

I had just finished reading an article in the Wall Street Journal, and was surprised to see Microsoft linking to the same thing. You see, this article delved into a multiyear power struggle between Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer that paralyzed many important Microsoft initiatives. Not an entirely positive piece.

You have to be registered for the Journal, but here's the article.

Microsoft Preps 7 Patches
Tomorrow is a relatively normal Patch Tuesday with seven patches set for release.

As usual, the patches focus on remote code execution. What's not so usual is that the patches address wireless networking and Bluetooth. Since wireless is the way many (most?) of us connect, these patches are well worth installing.

VM Wary
Microsoft isn't the only vendor with security issues (but I'll argue that it's the most upfront about them). VMware, which is as much an OS as it is a virtualization layer, recently plugged two hypervisor holes.

Unlike Microsoft, these vulnerabilities were reported by an outside company. The remote code injection flaws are in two VMware Linux tools, and the patches are fortunately now available.

Get the deets here.

This Web Server Not So Sun-ny
If you run Sun Java System Active Server Pages, you best get to patching. Security company iDefense (the same one that found the VMware problems) discovered a slew of vulnerabilities in the Sun Web server. Hackers can basically take over the whole deal, logging on, messing with files and running their own code.

Sun has updated the software, which takes care of the problems.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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