Seven Patches Piping

Tomorrow is another Patch Tuesday, and Microsoft is getting set to ship seven patches, four of which are deemed critical. The patches run the gamut, repairing everything from Windows Server to IE (it wouldn't be Patch Tuesday if this puppy didn't get a fix or two), to Outlook and XP. The bulletins also address SharePoint and spoofing.

Is Patch Tuesday working for you? Is there a better way? Let us know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

.NET Source: Look But Don't Touch!
Microsoft is releasing a whole heap of .NET 3.5 source code. Does this mean you can create your own .NET distribution? Not bloody likely. In this clear step in the right direction, Microsoft is allowing developers to look at .NET source code to help understand how it works and where problems may lie. But changing the code is still very much a no-no.

I can possibly see Microsoft's point here. In open source, when you modify code, you're either on your own or the community supports you. In the case of .NET, should it be Microsoft's responsibility to help when you've completely trashed .NET with your spaghetti code?

What would you do about open source if you ran Microsoft? Tell us all at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Protect Your Exec
A new exploit is aimed at tricking the world's highest-ranking executives into giving away precious corporate secrets. The spam/phishing scheme is based on e-mails with the names and titles of these bosses, and come with a Word doc promising a better job. Once opened, the hackers can gain access to the computers of the rich and powerful, and thus get at confidential files.

Tell your bosses they should be happy with their jobs and ignore these e-mails. Opening one could be embarrassing in a couple of ways!

XP Crackdown
Microsoft's licensing may among the most complex the software world has ever seen, but that doesn't give you the right to violate any of its many terms.

The most recent example is an extension to Windows Genuine Advantage with the catchy name "Get Genuine Windows Agreement." And since everything at Microsoft turns into an acronym (even BG), let's call this new plan GGWA.

Microsoft's concern is that customers that have a right to upgrade are instead doing full new installs. And Microsoft worries that enterprises aren't doing enough to protect their license keys, allowing for counterfeiters.

While this may well be a pain for law-abiding customers, Microsoft does have a right to protect its intellectual property. Agree, disagree? Tell me where I'm right or wrong at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

Featured

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.