Vista: Over 60 Million Served?

Microsoft is crowing about Vista sales, and for any other vendor, 60 million sold would be truly huge. But this is Microsoft we're talking about, and it's held to a higher standard.

With an installed base of Windows rounding about a billion, 60 mil is a drop in the PC bucket. And the 60 million figure itself is taking some heat, with critics pointing out that not all of these licenses are actually in use.

Still, I wouldn't mind being in Microsoft's shoes. Thick client PCs are still the main way we compute, and nothing -- not Linux nor the Mac nor Google -- is currently posing a serious threat.

Have you found any good resources about Vista compatibility? Let us in on them by writing dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Microsoft Uses Web To Talk Open Source
Want to find out exactly where Microsoft stands on open source? Don't bother using Google. Just pop over to http://www.microsoft.com/opensource/default.mspx. This spankin' new Web site details how Microsoft works with open source vendors, how Microsoft will support your mixed environment, and what open source projects Microsoft has in its otherwise proprietary pipeline. Pretty interesting reading.

Meanwhile, we covered these issues in detail months ago in a Redmond magazine cover story. Get the skinny here.

Live Getting Legs
After a speech last week by Ray Ozzie, I'm suddenly less confused about Microsoft Live.

At a financial analysts meeting, Ozzie told the bean counters and Gordon Geckos in attendance that Live is an entire platform consisting of four levels:

  • Global Foundation Services, which is the hardware (read: massive Microsoft data centers) that supports Web services
  • Cloud Infrastructure Services, which provides load balancing and deployment
  • Live Platform Services, which includes identity management and other application services
  • And last, but not least, are the apps themselves. Here you can collaborate, word process, surf and, of course, read all those advertisements that make this all possible.

This all sounds a bit like the old seven-layer OSI model for networks, with applications at the top. Except the OSI model has no provision for ads!

Maybe Print Is Dead!
I recently wrote an editorial arguing that print is not dead (and filed my copy pretty much the day my old employer, InfoWorld, killed its paper edition).

Since then, Network Computing (of which I was editor in chief for a spell) shut down, as did Optimize and, before that, the old Network Magazine.

These were all fine magazines, but what really gets my tears flowing is hearing that the Weekly World News will no longer be gracing our supermarket checkouts. This publication was one good read. Besides aliens, Bigfoot and Bat Boy, it has some amazing prose. If you want a perfect example of alliteration, just check out one of their leads.

There is clearly massive change in the world of media. But I still believe that those who do print right will survive for decades to come. Heck, my group has four magazines that all prove that point!

Do you love or hate print? Let us know at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Mailbag: Eugene Who?
A few weeks ago, Doug wrote about the fall of citizen journalism sites, whose effectiveness he compared to that of Eugene Tackleberry (of Police Academy fame). Bruce wonders how many readers missed the reference:

"You're going to school NOW, mister!" I'll bet more than 50 percent of your readers didn't even know who Eugene Tackleberry was until they looked it up. Question: Do you have a paper copy of the orginal Police Academy training quiz they handed out at movie theatres? I believe I have an original of it at home.

This brings up a good point: movie history. A lot of the "great movies" in the past 30 to 40 years are very unknown to the 20- to 30-year-old crowd. We gave our foreign co-worker here a list of the top 100 comedies of all time and she had a non-stop laugh riot. But many of our under-30 staff don't relate to famous quotes like the one above. Which makes it all the funnier when they don't get the jokes!

It is also my gut opinion that this line of movies made a star out of Steve Guttenberg who happens to be one of my most favorite actors.
-Bruce

Thoughts? Let us have 'em! Leave a comment below or send an e-mail to dbarney@redmondmag.com.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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