Redmond: Bigger and Badder Than Ever

Despite Google gains, Apple advances and open source success, the Redmond money train just keeps a-rollin'. Last week, Microsoft announced it brought in more than $10 billion in the more recent quarter. While big, these numbers still pale in comparison to HP's and IBM's. But Microsoft is all about profits and, in this case, had pre-tax profits of nearly $4.5 billion -- margins any self-respecting capitalist would be proud of. The big revenue guns were games, Visual Studio and SQL Server 2005.


Free Anti-Spyware: Is That So Wrong?

Millions have tried the beta, and now they can download the real thing as Windows Defender is done. Redmond's free anti-spyware program is now in version 1. Even better, the price hasn't changed: This little puppy is still free.

I am a friend of third parties, and if Defender was designed to undercut third-party prices but still add a billion or two to the well-stuffed Microsoft coffers, I'd be irritated. But a free tool to protect an OS we all depend on? Why, that's Nobel Peace Prize-territory in my book.

IE Will Never Be Perfect

Last week, two IE7 problems were reported. Microsoft disputes one and agrees with the other. One hole could ease phishing attacks (anti-phishing is one of the big, new features in the new Firefox). The other hole has nothing to do with IE7, but rather is an Outlook vulnerability, Microsoft points out.

These reports represent a new era where we'll all be talking about the security of Vista, IE7 and Office 2007. Let's all hope the issues are fewer and less critical than they've been with the older tools.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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