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Microsoft Security Director Steps Down

Redmond's security team is undergoing a revamp with the announcement that Andrew Cushman, director of Microsoft's Security Response Center (MSRC), will be stepping down to be replaced by group manager Mike Reavey.

Reavey's appointment, announced late Thursday, might be a sign that Microsoft is trying to step up its security push at a time when its patching process is facing increased scrutiny because of more pervasive threats.

Well-respected by both security experts and the hacker community, Reavey comes into the position after being a group manager specializing in emerging threats and vulnerability response, which includes Microsoft's monthly security bulletins.

Particularly with the threat of the Conficker worm still looming, Reavey seems to be just the man for the job. Over the years, he was instrumental in combating the Zotob, Sasser and Blaster worm outbreaks on Windows systems, and many consider him to be the face of the MSRC.

According to Microsoft, though Cushman is being replaced, he is not leaving the company. Instead, he will focus on developing ideas and strategies for Microsoft's larger, more collaborative security initiatives. Both Cushman and Reavey will continue to report to George Stathakopoulos, Microsoft's general manager of security engineering and communications.

About the Author

Jabulani Leffall is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in the Financial Times of London, Investor's Business Daily, The Economist and CFO Magazine, among others.

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Reader Comments:

Sat, Jan 24, 2009 Charles Norrie London

Messers Stathakopoulos, Cushman and Reavey need spend little looking round for the solution to Microsoft's malware problems, and should abandon efforts like "collaborative security initiative"s immediately.

They know quite well what the answer is. It is to install Ubuntu Linux Intrepid Ibex on every PC and the whole of the malware issue would go away.

Microsoft continually refuses to adopt safe and secure operating system design.

Issues: (1) close all ports unless, specifically opened. (2) User the Linux account control system (which one?) anything is better than what Redmond does. (3) Never allow access to the root account, unless specifically requested on a case by case basis.

With these three steps the greatest proportion of Microsoft's woes would disappear.

The easiest way to do it would be to download the Ubuntu package (remember freely available under GPL) rebadge it as say Windows 8, fire all marketing and 90% of programming staff and distribute it.

There's nothing in GPL to prevent them from charging. Naturally, it would be necessary for Microsoft to cease to threaten those they say have stolen their patents, for otherwise they would be in the position of suing themselves.

If there are windows apps for which there isn't a decent freeware alternative, which I doubt, then bundle in WINE as well.

It might be the end of the Gates Empire, but who cares about that!

Fri, Jan 23, 2009 Charles Norrie London

Whatever Microsoft does, it's like filling deckchairs on the boat deck of the Titanic.

They've got to install a safe OS which means using Linux, whether they want to call in Windows 2009 or whatever.


Winows as an OS is doomed, defunct and destroyed

Fri, Jan 23, 2009 Anonymous Anonymous

Whatever Microsoft does, it's like filling deckchairs on the boat deck of the Titanic.

They've got to install a safe OS which means using Linux, whether they want to call in Windows 2009 or whatever.


Winows as an OS is doomed, defunct and destroyed

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