News

Microsoft Releases Details on New Exams for MCSE on Windows Server 2003 Track

The company has modified the requirements of its certification programs for the MCSE and MCSA on Windows Server 2003 and provided an upgrade path for people certified on Windows 2000.

As it said it would do, Microsoft has modified the requirements of its certification programs for the MCSE and MCSA on Windows Server 2003 and provided an upgrade path for people certified on Windows 2000.

The new structure, which will be rolled out through the summer and fall, provides a path for candidates to move from the MCSA title to the MCSE title.

Candidates who are part of the first wave of titleholders on the new platform will be recognized as "early achievers" by Microsoft, though the company declined to provide details.

At the same time, Microsoft said it would make self-assessment functionality available on its Web site in March to allow users to check their expertise about certain aspects of the new operating system platform.

The MCSA Program
The Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator credential will still require four exams, consisting of three core tests and one elective. The core exams consist of two tests on networking and one on client systems. The networking exams, which are both new, are 70-290, Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Environment; and 70-291, Implementing, Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure. Candidates must take one of two currently available client OS tests: 70-270, Installing, Configuring and Administering Windows XP Professional; and 70-210, Installing, Configuring and Administering Windows 2000 Professional.

The requirements for the MCSA, as well as training that applies to each exam, are listed in table 1.

Table 1. MCSA on Windows Server 2003 Requirements
Core exams: Networking System (2 exams required) Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-290: Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment

2274: Managing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment (5 days)

2275: Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment (3 days)

2208: Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (5 days)

MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-290): Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Core Requirements, Exams 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294

Exam 70-291: Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure

2276: Implementing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure: Network Hosts (2 days)

2277: Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure: Network Services (5 days)

2208: Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (5 days)

MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-291): Implementing, Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Core Requirements, Exams 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294

Core exams: Client Operating System (1 Exam Required) Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-270: Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2272: Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Windows XP Professional (5 days)

2285: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional (3 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft Windows XP Professional (Exam 70-270)

MCSA/MCSE Microsoft Windows XP Professional Readiness Review (Exam 70-270)

Exam 70-210: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional

2151: Microsoft Windows 2000 Network and Operating System Essentials (3 days)

2152: Implementing Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional and Server (5 days)

MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, Second Edition (Exam 70-210)

MCSA/MCSE Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Readiness Review (Exam 70-210)

Elective exams
(1 Exam Required)
Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-086: Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0

828: Deploying and Supporting Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 (5 days)

2074: Administering Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 (3 days)

Nothing in print.
Exam 70-227: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000, Enterprise Edition

2159: Deploying and Managing Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000 (3 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000

Exam 70-228: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition 2072: Administering a Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database (5 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 System Administration

MCSE Readiness Review: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Administration (Exam 70-228)

CompTIA A+

and

CompTIA Network+

Not available.

A+ Certification Training Kit, Third Edition

A+ Certification Readiness Review

Network+ Certification Training Kit, Second Edition

Network+ Certification Readiness Review

CompTIA A+

and

CompTIA Server+

Not available.

A+ Certification Training Kit, Third Edition

A+ Certification Readiness Review

Server+ Certification Training Kit

However, whereas the MCSA on Windows 2000 offers a choice of 10 elective exams from Microsoft, the newer version will offer only three electives, all currently available:

  • 70-086: Implementing and Supporting Systems Management Server 2.0
  • 70-227: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000, Enterprise Edition
  • 70-228: Installing, Configuring, and Administering SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition

Candidates will also be able to take a combination of CompTIA exams in place of those electives (either the A+ and Network+ tests or the A+ and Server+ tests). However, that choice of elective won't transfer upward to the MCSE credential.

People who already have or obtain the MCSA on Windows 2000 can upgrade to the newer title by passing a single exam: 70-292: Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Environment for an MCSA Certified on Windows 2000.

Dan Truax, Director of Microsoft Certification Business & Product Strategy, said the upgrade exam would be a "normal length or potentially less." This is in contrast to the behemoth accelerated test made available to MCSEs on NT 4.0 who chose to upgrade their title to Windows 2000. Also unlike the Accelerated Exam, 70-240, which was available for about a year, this upgrade exam will exist for as long as the Windows Server 2003 exams will be around.

Microsoft will offer a two-day course through its training partners, to prepare candidates: Workshop 2209: Updating Systems Administrator Skills from Microsoft Windows 2000 to Windows Server 2003.

Is two days sufficient to learn what's necessary to be proficient on Windows Server 2003? "What [those candidates] do around supporting users, groups, rights to resources and network services like DNS, IP-absolutely," said Truax. "That's what our job role task analysis says." The task analysis, which took six months and involved more than 3,000 "customers," according to Truax, helped Microsoft define how to structure the programs for the new credentials.

Upgrade training material will appear in a self-study book too. It will apply to the upgrade exams for the new MCSE as well and possess one of the longer titles among the Microsoft Press line-up: MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exams 70-292 and 70-296): Managing, Maintaining, Planning, and Implementing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment for MCSAs and MCSEs Certified on Microsoft Windows 2000.

The new certification will also be a subset of the MCSE credential. "If you are going down the path [of MCSE],… you will become an MCSA along the way…" said Truax. "The core of the track is the same, and that is buried inside the MCSE."

The MCSA exams are expected to appear in the summer, according to Truax.

The MCSE Program
The Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer title will still consist of seven exams, but now the set will mandate six core and one elective vs. Windows 2000's five core and two electives. The core requirements break down like this:

  • Four networking system exams
  • One client operating system exam
  • One design exam

Along with 70-290 and 70-291, from the MCSA program, the MCSE also will offer two other networking exams:

  • 70-293: Planning and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
  • 70-294: Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure

Truax pointed out that 70-293 integrates the kinds of implementation and administration tasks that are covered in two separate exams in the Win2K track-70-216 and 70-217, Network Infrastructure and Directory Services, respectively.

The core design requirement can be fulfilled by one of two new exams: 70-297, Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure; or exam 70-298, Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network. Either of these can also be used as an elective in the track, as long as the candidate passes both of them.

The client OS exams consist of 70-210 and 70-270, comparable to the MCSA track.

On the elective front, Microsoft will give credit for one of seven different electives, three that are also relevant to the new MCSA title (in italics):

  • 70-086: Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0
  • 70-227: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000, Enterprise Edition
  • 70-228: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition
  • 70-229: Designing and Implementing Databases with Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition
  • 70-232: Implementing and Maintaining Highly Available Web Solutions with Microsoft Windows 2000 Server Technologies and Microsoft Application Center 2000
  • 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network

The requirements for the MCSE, as well as training that applies to each exam, are listed in table 2.

Table 2. MCSE on Windows Server 2003 Requirements
Core exams: Networking System (4 Exams Required) Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-290: Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment

2274: Managing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment (5 days)

2275: Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment (3 days)

2208: Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (5 days)

MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-290): Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Core Requirements, Exams 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294

Exam 70-291: Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure

2276: Implementing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure: Network Hosts (2 days)

2277: Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure: Network Services (5 days)

2208: Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows Server 2003 (5 days)

MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-291): Implementing, Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Core Requirements, Exams 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294

Exam 70-293: Planning and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure 2278: Planning and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure (5 days)

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-293): Planning and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Core Requirements, Exams 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294

Exam 70-294: Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure

2279: Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure (5 days)

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-294): Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Core Requirements, Exams 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294

Core exams: client operating system (1 Exam Required) Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-270: Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2272: Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Windows XP Professional (5 days)

2285: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional (3 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft Windows XP Professional (Exam 70-270)

MCSA/MCSE Microsoft Windows XP Professional Readiness Review (Exam 70-270)

Exam 70-210: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional

2151: Microsoft Windows 2000 Network and Operating System Essentials (3 days)

2152: Implementing Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional and Server (5 days)

MCSA/MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit: Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, Second Edition (Exam 70-210)

MCSA/MCSE Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional Readiness Review (Exam 70-210)

Core exams: design (1 Exam Required) Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-297: Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure

2282: Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure (5 days)

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-297): Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure

Exam 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network

2830: Designing Security for Microsoft Networks (3 days)

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-298): Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network

Elective exams
(1 Exam Required)

Microsoft courses Self-study
Exam 70-086: Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0

828: Deploying and Supporting Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 (5 days)

2074: Administering Microsoft Systems Management Server 2.0 (3 days)

Nothing in print.
Exam 70-227: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000, Enterprise Edition

2159: Deploying and Managing Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000 (3 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000

Exam 70-228: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition 2072: Administering a Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database (5 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 System Administration

MCSE Readiness Review: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Administration (Exam 70-228)

Exam 70-229: Designing and Implementing Databases with Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition

2073: Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database (5 days)

2071: Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2000 with Transact-SQL (2 days)

MCSE Training Kit: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database Design and Implementation

MCSE Readiness Review: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database Design and Implementation (Exam 70-229)

Exam 70-232: Implementing and Maintaining Highly Available Web Solutions with Microsoft Windows 2000 Server Technologies and Microsoft Application Center 2000 2203: Deploying and Managing Microsoft Application Center 2000 (2 days) Nothing available.
Exam 70-297: Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure 2282: Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure (5 days) MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-297): Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure
Exam 70-298: Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network

2830: Designing Security for Microsoft Networks (3 days)

MCSE Self-Paced Training Kit (Exam 70-298): Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network

Microsoft will offer two upgrade exams for people who have or intend to earn the MCSE on Windows 2000. One, 70-292, Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Environment for an MCSA Certified on Windows 2000, is the same upgrade exam offered for MCSAs on Windows 2000.

The second is specific to the MCSE title: Exam 70-296: Planning, Implementing, and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Environment for an MCSE Certified on Windows 2000. Training partners will be able to offer a three-day workshop—Updating Systems Engineer Skills from Microsoft Windows 2000 to Windows Server 2003—to help candidates prepare. The same self-study material applicable to the MCSA upgrade test will apply to these upgrade exams as well.

The MCSE-specific exams are expected to appear in the fall, said Truax.

He suggested that those candidates who have an MCSE on NT 4.0 consider moving to Windows 2000, since the electives are virtually the same. "[Many of] those electives will carry over, so you will not need to take another."

What does he recommend for experienced network professionals who have no certification currently? Should they wait or should they move now? "I recommend they start down the Windows 2000 path…. When they get to the right milestone, we'll give them a very quick way to get their [Windows 2003] credential…"

Self-Assessment
Starting sometime in March, Microsoft will make available on its Web site online individual assessment to support the launch of Windows 2003, which is expected to happen on April 24th. "Certification is all about the job role. Assessment is all about projects. They're smaller, in chunks. It's not high stakes," said Truax. The assessments, which in some cases will last about 30 minutes, will test a person's knowledge on specific discrete topics.

"Based on [a person's] score, we'll recommend resources that Microsoft offers. For training, it's at the module level; in books it's at the chapter level." Truax explained. "It's not about telling customers about pass-fail. It's how you scored relative to your peers. It's about specific areas. 'Here are some things that will help you prep…' It doesn't certify someone. It's just a good barometer."

For more, go to Microsoft's Training and Certification Web page:

comments powered by Disqus

Reader Comments:

Sat, Sep 13, 2008 Anonymous Anonymous

JAJA, UPYACHKA! UG NE PROIDET, BLYA!

Thu, Jun 12, 2008 Anonymous Anonymous

33d735f1af7274aa9d86f211f775fdfe

Mon, Jun 2, 2008 Anonymous Anonymous

microsoft exchange server 2003

Sat, Jun 24, 2006 Nilantha Sri Lanka

I was Mostly try to followed MCSE track but I havent more money followed it ,Pl.. if you can help me to followed this track I my bet hartly regard to you

Sun, Apr 17, 2005 Khalid Al-Ghamdi Saudi Arabia

I have been recently certified as MCSE on Windows Server 2003. I would like to mention that it takes a lot of reading and studying to be MCSE2003 certified & without that, it would be really hard to pass exams such as 70-290 & 70-291 ... Wish you all the best ... Regards, Khalid Al-Ghamdi

Thu, Feb 5, 2004 wangshikun wangshikun

my name is Wang Shikun
im's MCP

Wed, Jun 11, 2003 Nick Clark Springfield, IL

C'mon! They already went up $25! What now? I won't pay any more money unless the VALUE gets put back into those of us who have gone thru the NT4, 2000 and now 2003 tracks. That's alot of moola baby?

Any way to make the pie bigger for themselves. It becomes more clear every time they throw crap like this out there. To hell with them.

Thu, Jun 5, 2003 Njoku Ogadinma .N. Nipost, Garki, Abuja, Nigeria, West Africa

I would love to know how the exams will be conducted and the forms sent to us in Nigeria.

The cost of the exams forms , date, and location of the place.

Fri, May 30, 2003 Michael Anonymous

I have completed 4 of the 7 MCSE 2000 exams......reading all this, is pretty daunting....what do I do? I would think that Microsoft would make many friends, if they gave a free voucher to those certified and wanted to take a one-off exam! And if they were concerned too many people would take advantage of it, why not give the FREE voucher an expiry date?

Fri, Apr 11, 2003 Experience New Jersey

There has ceased to be a "professional career" in IT. We're all a bunch of stupid mice on a wheel cranking energy for M$. NO OTHER PROFESSION attempts to morph itself over & over to the point where you can't catch up (and if you think you can, you're only fooling yourself - you're only a professional exam-taker). What about organizational, people skills and depth of experience? IT's NON-EXISTENT in this "IT" field that churns out geeks that can answer tehcnical questions. You're all miserable and just to proud to admit this is a dead-end career no matter how you look at it. Go GET A REAL LIFE!

Tue, Mar 25, 2003 Kelvin Wong Malaysia

i'm sick to follow the M$ certification. Is MCSE2003 guarantee that i gonna find my job soon after i got MCSE2003??

Tue, Mar 18, 2003 Ron Kansas

What's the problem here?? Who says you have to go out and get certified as soon as possible?? Who says you have to spend thousands of dollars?? If you have your Windows 2000 MCSE, two upgrade tests is not unreasonable at all. Buy some books, play with the software, take your time... We JUST finished our Windows 2000 conversion... We'll get 2003 when it comes out, play with it in our test lab... A year from now, we'll probably upgrade our Domain Controllers, and any new Web Servers will probably be Windows 2003. I'll upgrade my certification someday. It'll cost me $350 (two tests and books), and some time... Course, I'll be spending the time learning Windows 2003 anyway. After all, I'm an IT professional. I LIKE to learn new things. That's why I'm in this field... Why are you complainers in this field?? Did you expect to learn Windows 2000 and then use it for the next 20 years??

Ron, MCSE (NT and 2000), CCNA

Tue, Mar 18, 2003 just me Deep deep deep in the South

I can understand the frustration over continued recertification. I stongly encourage all of you struggling with this decision to give it up now. Don't worry yourself over it anymore! I've gotten close to $40,000 dollars in annual pay raises in the last 5 years, more if bonus is figured into it, and my value will only go up when you whiners aren't adding to the number of MCSE's out there! And all of you Cisco doubters quit now too...I'm starting on that tract this summer... :-)

Mon, Mar 17, 2003 Dan Anonymous

Once you're an MCSE, I would like to see Microsoft help us sustain the certification by providing FREE MSDN and TechNET subscriptions as long as your certification is kept current. By becoming certified, these people become "salesmen" of the "Microsoft Way". Microsoft should treat them nicely in ways such as this.

Mon, Mar 17, 2003 MCSE 4.0 IA

Do what I am doing. Just stay one step behind in certification. I have been working with Windows 2000 now for 3 years and NT 4.0 4 years before that. I am now just starting to certify in 2000 and it is a walk in the park. You can stay one step behind in cert version and MS will never take it away. Smart companies won't adapt to such quick change, so don't worry about it! Plus you won't be considered a paper mcse/mcsa!

Mon, Mar 17, 2003 John Baltimore

I think that the value of the certification process has gone down, not up... just look at the salaries of the people who are MCSE 2000... barely $50,000... sad... when you have to spend all that money and time to get the cert in the first place... wish Micro$haft would go the route of Cisco and have a hands on lab for the higher level certs... CCIE still have value... judging from the ranges on Monster and Careerbuilder... :(

Mon, Mar 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

How many companies do you know of that will switch to a new technology, that is unsupported?
Companies will only convert to a new technology, if there is an adequate and ready source of support. That means us, boys and girls....
If you dont supportit, no one will switch to it!
Show your anger at Microsoft by letting your customers know that you will NOT support 2003!
Who in their right mind would then waste their money?
All of my companies customers are not even considering 2003 Server.
Money talks louder than words.
Microsoft depends on us to support their product, SO THEY CAN SELL IT!
No support, NO SALE!

Mon, Mar 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

It is stated "Microsoft will offer two upgrade exams for people who have or intend to earn the MCSE on Windows 2000. in the aarticle. This is unclear can somebody elborate on the word "intend"

Thu, Mar 13, 2003 Andrew indy

I am getting tired of these re-certs and constant exams. I am going to take the upgrade test, and if I pass, great. If I fail, I wont be any worse off !! Linux is looking good now. Maybe i'll just go back to e-commerce sales, I can make great money there without having to re-cert all the time !!!

Wed, Mar 12, 2003 Johan South Africa

I am a lecturer, teaching the MCSE course. We are running the 2000 track currently. All of my students asked me if their certification will be worth anything when they complete it. They were all concerned about what has been discussed in this article. Companies are still using NT and 2000 is not the quite the standard yet. Now MS expects companies to go for 2003? This is outrageous and should be stopped!

Thu, Mar 6, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Updating our Certification once again. Microsoft should provide us with practice exams and deep discounted classes for those who already have a certification.

Wed, Mar 5, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I remember hearing that there would be overlap between 2000 exams and the next windows platform (2003). The only overlap is 2000 Pro. That means doing another 6 exams for MCSE or 3 for MCSA? If you want to do the MCSE then you will probably have to do 2 exams per year. But at the end of it, there will be another release Windows 2006, and you will be back to square 1!

Wed, Mar 5, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

What can do a person with the MCSE NT4, is there a upgrade or something like that ?

Wed, Mar 5, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

what is the price MCSE server 2003 exam per modules???are there going to increase???

Wed, Mar 5, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

how many times can we try to take the exam to upgarding the MCSE 2000 to MCSE 2003???

Mon, Mar 3, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Mandate a 4-year degree. Then the class distinction between MCSEs and the ComptTia people will be obvious. MCSEs should be College Grads and technically comptetent. Too many idiots that don't value education think its a quick way to a US 'degree' and cheat their butts off via Brain Dumps. Take the MCSE away from the GED and vocational school crowd. Upscale it.

Mon, Mar 3, 2003 Carl London

I think the main problem is with the image of the qualification, which in the mid-to late 90s, was damaged by non-technical users being able to attain MCSE status. This could have been avoided by requiring references for 2-3 years of prior IT experience, before being able to take the MCSE.

Another thing Microsoft could have done for the .NET track would have been to increase the difficulty of the exams. Raise the pass mark to 80% across the board in addition to not being able to review your answers as per Cisco exams, in exam simulations could also be an option. And whats wrong with a small practical lab examination?

I think there should be a security component to the MCSE also with a background check ala CISSP.

Sat, Mar 1, 2003 Tim Left Field

The turning point for me was Microsoft’s 70-218 for the MCSA track. It has a skill set that combines exams 70-215, 70-216 and 70-217. Since the exams 70-215 and 70-216 are already required for the MCSA track why not just use the 70-217. This would imbed the MCSA certification into the MCSE and save professionals $200 CAD without losing any measured skills. As we can see with the 2003 track they corrected this, though history repeats itself with the 2000-2003 upgrade path. Two exams are required to upgrade MCSE 2000 to MCSE 2003. One for the MCSA imbedded portion and one for the MCSE portion. According to Microsoft both exams cover the same objectives. Professionals get ready to give away another $200 CAD for nothing. Somewhere there was a Vice-President of Marketing for the Training and Certifications branch getting a pat on the back for creating a 12% revenue making scheme.

Sat, Mar 1, 2003 Tim Left Field

Brain dumps hurt the credibility of those who genuinely know the product, but I laugh at the thought of any certification provider actively putting a stop to them. Supporting other authorities for specific investigations is the farthest I can see them go. I wouldn’t be surprised if they were the same companies obscurely promoting them. Ahhh, is that a TestKing ad on your web site? Brain dumps increase revenues for certification providers by giving confidence to those without genuine knowledge and experience. The more confidence an individual feels towards passing, the more likely they are going to pay $200 CAD to write an exam. Another pat on the back for some Marketing VP.

Sat, Mar 1, 2003 Tim Left Field

Five years ago one certification path was enough for an employer. In today’s market two and three certification paths are required for the same position, yet without any increase in salary. You do the math, 12-20 certification exams = $$$$$$. Now add course costs and training materials then multiply that figure every three years. Yeah I feel sick too, especially when I consider how much of the same information is regurgitated between and within certification exams.

Sat, Mar 1, 2003 Tim Left Field

I would wager that many of the positive comments in this thread are posted by Microsoft to promote their new product and create legitimacy to professionals. I too am weary with the exam game. It is an investment that often has no return. Consider the different avenues of certifications required from employers who have no understanding or consequence of the skills measured.

Sat, Mar 1, 2003 Ken Rosen Microsoft

You guys have lots of comments and feedback, and I'm reading it all. If you still have burning questions, though, post them on the MCSA-MCSE Changes forum, and I'll be glad to address them!

Ken Rosen
Product Manager, MCSA and MCSE
Microsoft Training and Certification

Fri, Feb 28, 2003 NoMoreAfterNT4 Anonymous

Here's a question that would-be employers should ask in interviews: "When was the last M$ Security Bulletin and what did it cover?". How many "Paper" MCPs are going to answer that one? M$ should try putting this real world scenario on their tests: Taking down your network for installing Security Patches and Updates (And praying that everything still works after they're installed!). And better yet, don't ask the question in Multiple Choice, T or F or even essay form. Let's make a simulator for THAT!

Fri, Feb 28, 2003 NoMoreAfterNT4 Anonymous

Since I know firsthand how M$ eats our wallets dry with certification after certification, I'm glad to have given my experienced suggestions to companies still running NT4 to ignore any so called upgrades. There's no reason to upgrade at least a year before IP version 6 comes out and that may be another five-seven years. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!". And besides, the money saved can be used to give me a nice bonus at the end of the year for staying under budget.

Thu, Feb 27, 2003 KATIPUNERONG KALBO Anonymous

kumusta sa lahat ng mga taga-calatagan, carmona, sta. maria, mangatarem, at sa lahat ng tao sa buong mundo.

Thu, Feb 27, 2003 KATIPUNERONG KALBO Anonymous

ayos yan... ayos talaga... ayos na ayos!!!

Thu, Feb 27, 2003 anonymous Anonymous

haha..being a MC$E now, what benefit still can get after we have completed the upgrade exams?? real skills?? more passed transcripts?? For M$ server platform most companies still using NT4, just because there is nothing different after they have upgraded to Windows 2000(Different is the ADS??? it's suck, copied from other companies). Too many functions in Windows 2000 already and now 2003 has released. Also in the market there are many subside instead of Windows 2000 or 2003's built-in functions. When use Windows 2003 all the hardware need to upgrade also, then the cost will very high for both software and hardware. Really worth to use M$ 200x Servers?? And get tri-certified?????

Thu, Feb 27, 2003 The Brainstorm TuffStuff Inc. Abuja,Nigeria

Terrific!,indeed.If you want be in dynamic world,such as IT World then you have to be learning new things every day.MS should not be blamed for introducing the NEW MCSE/MCSA track, at least win2k has being around almost 3 yrs,and if there is New set of products and you want show your expertise,then you have to build your skills and validate it by taking exams related to the new technology.How can we prove that,we can realy work windows 2003 server?The only way is through exams.Hence,whoever that has win2k MCSE or MCSA will only need to take 70-292 and be current,that's all.Kudos to MS and i really appreciate its efforts.

Wed, Feb 26, 2003 anonymous Anonymous

Do not loose track of what you are doing we want to be updated and informed .
There sould be a update but we paid to get where we are now it's Microsoft's turn to show us a way not to be against each other but to show us a way we all can benefit the way of a normal working person not a CEO not a Director but to all the people that work hard to pass and wants to move forward in life .
So Micosoft what are you going to do for us ?

Wed, Feb 26, 2003 anonymous Anonymous

what is going on with microsoft?
I understand that they are updating their software but what about all those people that are certified. Can Microsoft provide
seminars for those that have taken some of the exams and only take some exams to update to current . If we are updated then the program will be a successful. We support Microsoft and pay for it so Microsoft must support us as well ..
free exams

Wed, Feb 26, 2003 Frodo Baggins Shire

I bet most of these people who complain are paper MCSEs. If your heart is into IT, learning something new, like a new OS, is fun.

Wed, Feb 26, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I'm on my way to complete my Win2K MCSE track when news of this new cert track overshadowed my optimism. I spent a lot of time, money, and effort on it. I should have gotten myself an MS degree or non-vendor certifications.

Wed, Feb 26, 2003 SickNTired California

I'd rather take a degree course in IT.

Tue, Feb 25, 2003 Philip Oyeniyi 17 Ofada street Mushin Lagos Nigeria

Dir Sir,
I have no dout about MCSE Program is a good thing you are doing I am very interesting but finacially am not boyant if you can help me to send training material on MCP that is the one interest me most because I'm into Networking Engineer I will be greateful if you can help me and send it to this postal address: 17 Ofada street Mushin Lagos Nigeria. or Neatron Technologies 112 Fadeyi Ikrodu road Lagos Nigeria

Sun, Feb 23, 2003 Certifiable Minneapolis

Doctors, Financial Advisors, Insurance Agents, Etc... They all need continuing Ed and they need to prove they had it. What makes us any different? I just hope they have another 70-240 and it knocks out the entire core! MCSE NT 2000

Sun, Feb 23, 2003 Reece Miami

Quit whining? Keep up on certifications or get out of IT? What a load of crap that is. In case some of you M$ cronies didn’t know, there is more to IT than just certifications. I know plenty of people with the “MCSE” certification, that cannot even set up a printer. I also know of people with IT degrees who can barely even turn on a computer. Bottom line, in some cases it's good to have some sort of certification, but experience is golden.

Sun, Feb 23, 2003 ED USA

I have mixed feelings about the 2003 track. I switched to IT from Biotech because the certification track seemed like a much better deal financially than going for my Ph.D. (if you factor in the cost of grad school and competing for post doc positions ... a few certification exams aren't a big deal) I was lucky to get a job in the IT field before the economy tanked.

I too feel steached thin by present working conditions. I have an NT MCSE and am two tests shy of the Win 2K. Will I go for 2003? I'll wait for the last word from Microsoft. If it's just two tests then I don't see the big deal. I will probably finish win 2k and take a year off from Microsoft I think getting more well rounded by persuing ohter certs (Cisco, Linux, security ) makes a lot more sense.
What ever any of you decied I wish you good luck

Sun, Feb 23, 2003 Kaalia Canada

TOO MUCH..2 MUCH.. This certification crap is getting beyond control. What is the use of getting certified. I am a NT4 MCSE and upgraded to MCSE 2K with that silly upgraded 4 hours exam. But till now, i never got a decent job and especially when i am not that rotten paper MCSE. Having all the knowledge and skills and continously striving hard to upgrade my certifications has done me no good till today. I think this certification stuff is the way of doing business and make big bucks for these already rich corporations . And we like fools spend thousands of dollars each to get in the track they've laid in front of us without realising the fact that its our money that is going in their pockets and in return we get BS... [This comment has been edited. -- Editor]

Sat, Feb 22, 2003 RobH Springfield, MO

Nice to know my experience and certifications on Exchange 2000 don't amount to squat in the .NET World Order. SMS 2.0? C'mon, Bill, give me some slack here.

Fri, Feb 21, 2003 AL.KARTHIK INDIA,DELHI

This means we need to shell out more Dollars for the Exams once again.
Make sure you provide free upgrade options.

Fri, Feb 21, 2003 Karthik Chennai

Microsoft should honor their old valued MCSE in Windows NT who upgraded to Win2k by giving them free vouchers to move on to Win2k 2003 track. After 5 yrs of exp and already certified in two MCSE tracks, I dont feel like investing another $1000 for Win2k 2003.

Fri, Feb 21, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

MS is trying to get richer everyday life. I'm going to take the last exam of MCSE on March 2003 and I can't think of getting an upgrade until Windows 2003 Server really conquers the market.

Thu, Feb 20, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Blaaaaah blaaaah blaaah... ;-(

Thu, Feb 20, 2003 Michael Domingo Irvine, CA

Carl, Microsoft actually announced in early December 2002 (see the news archive) that it would be rescinding earlier statements about the mix-and-match scenario. In essence, your certification is not affected and in fact, there is a very smooth path to the 2003 track should you so decide to upgrade. Remember, too, that the Win2K track will likely be valid for at least another year and that upgrading is NOT required.

Thu, Feb 20, 2003 Carl NC

Microsoft lied to us all. Earlier it said that 2000 MCSE's would not be affected by the .net or now called 2003 certifications. What was the purpose of lying? When will 2000 MCSE certifications expire?

Thu, Feb 20, 2003 Allen NYC

Stop all of the dam whining move your self forward or move the hell out of IT. This is the life you have decided upon IT is fast and furious if you want it to slow down get out. The market being the way it is now is the time to continue to strengthen your skills. I am happy that the pace is fast maybe w can weed the shackers out.

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Curtis Philadelphia

M$CE's are going through this now like the Novell CNE's did in the last decade. I did give up on my Novell Master CNE certification since no client of ours was upgrading to Netware 6 (much less Netware 5). It's where the market is. If the majority of the companies go with Linux in the next 10 years, fine! What I did do was go back to school for a master's degree (MBAs and BA/BS's seem to hold up longer on the resume). I didn't bother upgrading my MSCE 4.0 to 2000 since the product lifespan and cert program was (and is) way too short. My advise is to leapfrog the MS certifications. Save yourself the extra grief and $$$. In five years, who is going to care if you are Win 2000 certified? They might if you have a MSCE 2003 but again, it depends on the market......

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I really looks like a lot of us may not take these exams! I don't plan to either. I don't feel that busisness needs warrant the move to .NET anytime soon so why waste the time and money. I say wait on this one if you already are certified on 2000.
I personally feel that if MS wants MCSE's to get certified so we can push their products, they really need to make it much easier for us that are already part of the family(ha ha) to get updated.

Like free study material
free platform media
free exams with no deadlines

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

wawwwww what are we hearing, i work daily for 17hrs in computer field in maintaining hardware software and Networks in order to pay for the MCSE track ad after i have payed about 3500$ for studying the courses and reparing my self hardly to go through the exams to find my self nothing...How come???? its going so fast so expensive no benefits till now.....what are U DOING MicROSft???? hey we are human Being not a human Doing.. am and alot of my friends working on MCSE 2000 track will never try to get any certificate from microsoft any more...THANKS MICR$OFT... <<((((MONEY SEEKER

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Pat Boston, MA

Wow, lots of negativity out there. We've all choosen to function in a field that is constantly changing, and the need to keep our skills updated is part of the package. Times are tough, budgets are tight, people are stretched so thin that they are becoming transparent - it's frustrating. But realize that you and your current certifications have value, recertify if it makes sense, and stop sweating it.

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

It was announced MS now has over 10 billion shares of stock outstanding after this week's split. That would be 80 shares per US citizen if MS was nationalized (around $2000 ea citizen) Gates still owns over 10% of the outstanding shares. Nationalize MS!

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Well, I'm MCSE NT & W2K, and half way completed on Cisco's CCNP track. Goodbye Microsoft! You're not worth the effort anymore! I'm sticking with Cisco from now on.

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

So, when may those of us already W2K certified get our FREE vouchers for the Upgrade exams????

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Someone proficient in Win2K shouldn't have any problems upgrading. The exams should keep getting easier with more experience---if they don't---well there's some problem there. How much has RAID changed since you first learned it? or TCP? or DNS? or DHCP? or the concept of an HCL?

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Ok ! Let's say I'll try to take this new exams.
But, after I finish (if I finish), I'll have to take another ones because MS is moving to another OS. After 2 ears of exams, because this is how long it takes to pass all the exams (for real, not with help from braindump sites), you will look back and say : "Does it worth it ?"
NO ofcours, because,NEWS YOU ARE OUT OF DATE !
So why even try to take this new exams ?
They are beter things to learn like: CISCO, ORACLE, WLANS and way not UNIX/LINUX.
(Please excuse my english)

Wed, Feb 19, 2003 Harry UK

I am a little confused as to the electives for MCSA. Is this qulification not supposed to be for Admins running Windows? What has ISA, SMS or SQL got to do with basic windows admin ??? What are Microsoft trying to achieve, to get rid of the future of the MCSA qualification?

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Bert Irvine

Being in the IT field for 15 years, then suddently laid off (downsized), I felt it was the time to finally get certified. I am almost through with the MC$A and then soon going to MC$E...all 2K, but when I get done, what next?? Will a company hire me since I am not 2003?? I agree that the rollout for .NET won't happen for a few years, at least until the first service release is out from M$.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 John San Jose, CA

I love all these anonymous posters! $90.00 per hr. and anonymous huh?

I say B.S. in B.S. is more like it!

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous louisville

Computers almost completely change both in hardwware and software every 3-4 years. If you aren't willing to keep up then go flip burgers! Their technology and skills stay constant. When I wnet through the 2000 track it too me 3 months of work. Any decent company will reimberse you for books and passing scores. I have passed 17 MCP exams and failed 0 because I am not paper. If you have the experience, read the traing kit one weekend and go take the stupid test. 2 tests 3 weeks and boom 2003 MCSE. Stop your whineing you sound like children. I am MCSE MCSA CCNA Aplus BSInformation technology and have 7 years experience. I will keep up, it's not hard, and I will never need for a job. I make $90 per hr.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anthony Miami

Johnny Blaze from NJ, hit the nail on the head.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 John Anonymous

Your W2K certs are not outdated. Nobody's moving to .NET anytime soon. MS is having trouble moving people from NT to 2K, that's why they implemented Software Assurance 6.0 program. I would advise anyone currently certifying to finish W2K because no employer is going to be looking for a .NET only MCSE. Persoanlly, I'd rather have an NT and W2K employee than a .NET only employee. Do W2k this year, take a year off, then do the .NET upgrade.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Ohio

I've got my MCSE for NT & 2000 but this still looks like a money grab. To prepare and update our Windows Servers (again) just to send MS more money for something we don't need? No wonder my company is installing Unix servers all over the place.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Pat WV

Glad I knew M$ was going to stick it to us. I'm a 2000 MCSA I am only 2 tests away from MCSE 2000 and have been a 1 person IT dpt for over a yr now for a local cell phone company using 2000 Servers, Exchange, and XP Workstations. This time I'll let my company pay for certifications for 2003. Too bad we don't have a tech union.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Johnny Blaze NJ

Ok, heres the thing. All of you Anonymous probable MS employees need to either get a life or understand what the chief complaint is here. Money. I have no problem taking tests but alot of companys do not pay for training. The tests alone are $125 a pop. So If Im working on NT4, and 2 years go by since my last cert, I may want to take a course so I have a chance knowing what Im talking about. You Anonymous people bitch about braindumpers but you slam people who are open about honest studying and the cert game is killing them. We all have rents to pay and If your STUPID enough to think this is not a revenue game then I suggest you go out and find a life because If you have the time to do all this I imagine its been a long time since you had a date. Heres a policy that nobody would argue, If you have previously passed your exams to become an MCSE then your upgrade tests are free and you should be provided with a licensed copy of that product because we support it. Period.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

By the time MS works out the bugs in Server 2003 it will be 2006, which means we will write have to write the new 2006 anyway, so........... Should we all just suck it up and soldier on????

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

It is about money. Maybe Bill doesn't care any more. But the guys under him do care.
Your money is counted for their stock options.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 michael Cmaeroon

microsofts releases are not so bad like someone try to explian it the problems is not to have the certification but the better skill that can be found among it pro.
We must understand clearly not only win2k win server2003 but the core of functionality OS of the new release.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Kate Houston

Cisco certs are required to recertify every 2 years. Auto mechanics are recertifying every 2 years, even your heating & cooling specialist on your air conditioning units! Would you hire a certified mechanic to work on your car or hire a guy that just open up a gas station and put up an auto shop sign? Get real here. Some of these guys work on systems much cheaper than your company's network and they have to remain up to date. The last time that I had to upgrade my MCSE to W2K was in 1999. That is 4 years ago. FOUR!!! If you boys can’t take the heat get out. May be enough whiners drop out, the market will clear up for the rest of us.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Marco Netherlands

What suprises me is that Exchange 2000 is not a requirement any more, this must be an error. Further i'm surprised about SMS 2.0 being acknowledged as an requirement and at last I miss the upgrading exam. MCSD-ers get a free voucher, why would MCSE-ers not get a free voucher for an upgrading exam (like 70-240)

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 don hoo Portland Or

Don't jump the gun, MS may change things again before this summer and fall hit. But, seriously 2 tests for MCSA,MCSE 2003 isn't that bad. Like Joe from san diego said, it's only 2 more. Get used to it or go flip burgers.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I personally don't think its a big deal.
I just completed my MCSE last week and
now pursuing my CCNP. I dont see the big deal in taking 2 extra tests.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Ron Anonymous

Skipping an OS is becoming more appealing to me considering the speed at which our certs become absolete. I have completed both NT4 and W2K tracks and have reaped many benefits from doing so. However, we are just now nearing the end of the W2K migration process at my present employer and will most likely not upgrade again for 5 years. It's not important for me to upgrade again based on that. As long as Microsoft continues to recognize the validity of legacy OS certs (for which I commend them) I'll be fine. Novell has done it for years. I work for a non-profit. That means no matter how hard MS pushes, there's only so much money available here for OS upgrades. As long as we're using W2K here, my employer is happy to have a W2K MCSE on board.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Annoyed HELL

It happened to me in the NT4 Track and now that I have desided, after all, to do the Windows 2000 track, it is happening again. I do certification and spend thousands on training and half way through the exams M$ say hey lets have another Certification path ...we are obviously running out of money here (as if). Everyone needs an MCSE just to get an interview these days. Even though I have over 10 years of experience that doesn't seem to mean much. . . . This is wonderfull news NOT, good timing M$.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous England

No one is force to get certified or upgrade his/her certification. If you think that it does not have value, just don't do it. Do not critisize Microsoft or those people that want to be up-to-date.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anthony Miami

Yes the merry-go-round is turning to fast, and I will gladly get off. And for all of you Anonymous M$ cronies, be brave show your name. I'll didn't waste my time on 2K certification, because you know why, because as many have said certification just helps you get into the door. Once you are there it's you don't need to keep getting so many certs for a point and click, utlra user-friendly operating system. Your comments, your attacks welcomed, because you know it's true. So go ahead bend over and continue to take it up the rear from M$.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Quit complaining. If you don't like it, don't take it!

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Glad there is an upgrade path for my W2K MCSE, for the rest of you naysayers, if the merry-go-round is turning too fast, get off.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I don't mind to take more and more... tests. It forces me to accommodate studying in my busy schedule. But I do mind the price of the tests. They should be free. I see it different way, I think Microsoft has more benefits from certified professionals than we have. The big 'army' of technical support for their product is built for free.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Dennis Milwaukee

The new 2003 server has new products and enhanced features. Even though many of the principals are the same taking the certs are a good way to break the ice on learning the new features. MS does not require you to recert like cisco does therefor if you like to be on the edge of technology this is great news otherwise you have the choice to stay where you are at and slowly be replaced by those who wish to remain current in the field. Though companies may not move to 2003 quickly - i know mine won't since we just know are completing the move to 2000 - they will in a few years. At that time would you rather be certified in the product for a year or two or do you want to learn it on the fly. I think employers prefer you have it under your list of stats for a length of time and not that you would rather wing it or be forced to learn it at the last minute.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Bite me Anonymous

I see a recurring theme here - many of you don't know how to read or study.
1. 2003 requires Exchange 2003, so why in the hell would Exchange 2000 count as an elective?
2. Why are people spending 7 to $12,000 on exams??!! These tests are fairly easy, and I don't see how anyone could possibly justify spending more than $40 on a book. So you spend too much money, and then you complain.
3. It's been YEARS since a new track has been released - I have no pity for anyone who took this long to get Win2k certified.
Go back to burger flipping. Of course, you'll probably complain about not getting enough free meals.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anthony Miami

I’m feel sorry for all those people who are in the middle of getting their MCSE on the 2000 track, but now maybe you will understand what many of the NT 4.0 MCSE(s) were feeling a when M$ decided to kill off NT 4.0. I’m happy for those people whose companies have the money to keep upgrading to the newest Window’s OS every couple of years, however my company just does not do that. Why, because there really is no need to do so, no matter what M$ says. Honestly, I just cannot continue to participate in the certification merry-go-round, so good luck to all of those who can.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

What's all this complaining? I'm certified on the working storage section of COBOL and never felt more secure in my job. I just wish I had time to get certified on the procedure division.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Jim Carmichael Connecticut

Ladies, asta la vista. I've been using the Brainbench tests for 6 months now. They are more real world, more challeging, and oh yes - don't burn a whole in your wallet. And my employer loves them! Give my regards to M$.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Esimpson Atlanta

I have my NT4 MCSE and am 1 exam away from W2K MCSE, which I will probably finish. I dont see myself going through the headache of .net MCSE, I just dont see the value anymore. With over 10 years expierence I dont make anywhere close to the $$$ reported in those salary surveys........SHOW ME THE MONEY!!!!SHOW ME THE MONEY!!!!!

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

A new cert has one positive effect: existing braindumps become outdated. I think most see WIN 2003 as WIN2K Version 2. It's a new set of exams, but much of it is common to WIN2K.

Why would someone entering the field now (or next year) want to take exams marked as WIN2K? Because people that took the WIN2K exams don't want the exams updated to reflect a new product release? I'm not sure that attitude makes sense and should be a driver behind exam updates.

Anyone getting hired by someon that knows the products will know an MCSE on either WIN2K or 2003 are basically equivalents. I can't imagine a hiring decision coming down to that one differentiator when job experience, interviews, and references count for so much more.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 John Troini Gilroy, CA

When I prepared for my CCNA and then subquently took and passed the test, I was pleasantly surprised that the test actually tested me on material presented during the training and actually asked questions in a clear and concise manner.

Most of my MSCE training is self study supplemented by significant additional readings and lab time on my personal server "farm" - how many people can afford this, yet, in point of fact, this is essential to pass MCSE tests - unless one's only goal is a "Paper MCSE".

From my perspective (1) I have no problem with maintaining currency on the Microsoft products, but, (2) Microsoft should reflect upon CISCO's certification process which includes demonstrating your skills in a real environment - in other words fix the testing/certification process to reflect the real world.

While MS Press has improved its materials, it has significant additional efforts to make it accurately prepare one for the myriad of MCSE tests.

Microsoft - build better tests that ask clear and conicse study materials based questions and provide lab test environments for the real world.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Money, Money, Money...Microsoft has lost it. I have a MCSE on 2000 and they want me to take 6 upgrade tests to get an MCSE on 2003! I have a Unix background also and Linux just started looking a lot better.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Italy

I'm really tired of this M$ cert. game!! :( I'm an MCSE and COMPAQ cert. but i can't understand why M$ put this new product (2003) on the grill but for money...just only to make money...
I remember that in one of fewer microsoft new last year was written: "The MCSE 2000 cert. will be valid as a cert. for MCSE 2003"...as far as i can see...it seems that they've changed idea... Sorry Bill... i know your AD and win 2000 are a good office o.s., but now i'm moving toward Open Source community...and i will put all my efforts in trying to arise the value of all Linux community!....Even by getting a certification...
Guys open your eyes...

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

WIN2K is a very good OS/LAN product. Office 97 was overkill for many -- a great product. In an age of shrinking payrolls and with desktop products that have a 5 year lifespan or longer, it's a bad sign for LAN growth. 2003 server will be a real slow roll out IMHO--and most of those licenses will be in the App Server space for security enhancements, Exchange upgrades, IIS 6 and SQL 2003 when released. .DOTNET server and XP products will be running in 2010. There's no productivity gains to be had from upgrading existing Win2K/Office2000 desktop systems. The Desktop OS, Office suites, PC computer,Internet(TCPIP) and AD/LAN products are mature products and have entered a commodity phase. What will be common in 2010? DVD-R on the desktop, an increased wireless presence, more teleconferencing, speech-to-text? Nothing revolutionary. Nothing to compare with the 7 year roll out of Windows, Office, Internet(TCPIP) and Active Directory from 1994 to 2001.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I'll give up Microsoft
VIVA LINUX

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

There is no sight of any Exchange exams in the group of electives. Is MS comming whith yet a certification in the near future? Something like MCMAIL, MCMAD or MCEXit:-)

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 John at Work

Where's Exchange, surely this should be an elective??

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Matt Kyiv

Think this one through-- because of complaints, MS has just given NT4 another year to live (for support at least). Many firms are only now making the move to Win2k. The skills and information that many of you whine about are THE SAME skills you'll need, in any Windows network, be it Win2003/XP, Win2k, or NT4. Obviously, no one likes paying for so much for certification. But you've got to remember, nobody forced you to work in IT. Nobody made you choose MS certification. If you don't like MS, use Linux. It's a free world.

Also, realize that (at least so far) Microsoft hasn't pulled anything like "UPGRADE OR DIE!" announcements. I want to believe they've learned from their mistakes in the past. Also, remember that Win2k came out, what 4 years ago? (or something like that) Win2003 hasn't even been release yet, so YOU HAVE TIME!!! What's the rush?

I for one do see the value in being a charter member, simply because these braindumps sites are being shut down fast enough. In the long run, I see Microsoft needing to be doing more to protect the certification many of us have invested considerable funds into. But it's not just Microsoft. Gosh, TestKing even has their link on this site!!! To me, that's just nicely formatted braindumps. :-(

I guess I just get tired of all the complaints against MS. First, they're aren't the only ones with questionable business tactics; for some reason, because they're the biggest, they're first on the list. Secondly, MS has accomplished what no other company has come close to in terms of OS software and desktop software. They've created the standard that the computer world revolves on. It follows that they're doing what they can to develop technolgy at a reasonable pace, both for the market and for the IT specialists. Aren't you glad they don't upgrade their product lines every year?

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Roberto Forlimpopoli (FC) Italy

Yes, maybe it's frustrating taking new exams in order to continue to keep your MCSE credential, but on the other hand certification is even a valuable means to demonstrate your expertise. Finally, I guess that everyone of us should stay up to date with the state of the art of the technology with or without taking MS exams. It's up to you taking cert exams, if you feel comfortable without them, you could show off your expertise either. Sometimes your boss or the market place require a cert to give you confidence; well, in that case you can always negotiate a trade off if you really know your stuff.

Tue, Feb 18, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Yup, just what I guessed, Gates is running short on $$$. Here in Fl, MCSE costs THOUSANDS...How, $899 Lab fee in college+ 125 per MS exam= 1024 per exam, and 7 exams for MCSE = around $7k ....NO THANKS MS

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Ralf Anonymous

Question: If I don't pass an update exam for W2003, can I take it another time (vs. one update chance of W2000)?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 DE Washinton State

Whine, whine. More tests, more money.

I've been certified and working in the field since '95. Lately I've been watching job postings and seeing nothing but demands for 4-year degrees along with an MCSE. Based on that I've started a program for a Comp. Sci. Bachelors that will take me about 6 years taking two-thirds of a full load. On average this is going to cost me about $250 (US) per month for the first 3 years and about $550 per month for the last 3 years.

At the same time I'll be doing self-study for MS tests and working full-time.

If all I had to do to stay current and stay employable was take one or twos MS tests per year and work in the field, I'd be happy as a clam!

The whiners will get little sympathy from THIS knowledge worker!

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

The way the economy is going and with the pressure to compete at this level, I think I'm ready to put a gun to my head. I mean, what's the point? We work and study our butts off for all these years and then the economy takes a dive and then the corporations export our jobs to some 3rd world toilet of a country. The upgrade to Win2K3 wont be that hard or anything, but what's the point? why should I even try? I'm still going to lose the house, the car and end up in a trashy apartment somewhere in Dallas with a low paying Sr. Network Engineer position.....

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Face it: We're all going to be making $10 an hour.....

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Certifications are hardly worth anything anymore, except to break into the field. Job experience is the key. Those who have experience will be the ones who get the jobs...and there aren't that many IT jobs the way the economy is now.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Walter Salt Lake City

Look back a few pages and there is a comment regarding a CCIE-level MCSE-type certification. It would be great to eliminate the posers but nobody at Microsoft has the balls to put forth a cert only 10-20 thousand true professionals could pass. I asked Anne Marie Whatsherface (late of Microsoft Education) some VERY pointed questions on the topic that she found REAL uncomfortable. Her responce was some BS about not being able to "scale" the exam for worldwide delivery. I take that as code for "We can't figure out how to make a practical exam that 500,000 idiots can braindump and "pass" and make people think it's something special. IOW - if it were useful enough that a professional might value the cert, it's of NO use to Microsoft education. Those would be all the people that get bonused based on the number of certified individuals. Quality of said certified individuals does NOT enter into anyones thought process at Microsoft.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Walter Salt Lake City

I don't mind playing the cert game at all. But what SERIOUSLY pisses me off is that Microsoft pays lip service to exam security and let's the braindumpers degrade the value of the cert so much that it is mandatory to say "I'm an MCSE, but I REALLY know something." I'll be a Charter MCSE again or whatever it gets called this time for no other reason than to establish the fact that I can pass the tests legitimately. IMO anyone that waits more than 60-90 days gets a tainted cert. If that pisses you off then you get the point. It should!

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Prince Ewan Airhiavbere London,UK

What can be better than Windows NT2000. Win 2003 will not stand the test of time. Win NT is still the best and it is widely accepted by most companies.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I just start my MCSA 2000 last month, and not even take any test yet.... What wrong with Mocrosoft.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Mark Janov I.E. California

Excited, and Fustrated!
So Close to MCSE and yet another grip of tests. $7k For training and Months of Prep work just to find out that my skills will be considered Outdated before I finish. I feel like a Processor in the middle of the Production line about to go to Market, Hope I will be Utilizied and get use of my full potential instead of siting in a dark corner waiting to be scraped for the new version. So once again I'll say that I am Excited and Fustrated.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Muhammed Qasim Pakistan

I've been sick of this cert game, I don't need it anymore. I would it prefer when microsoft may provide free coucher and studying material. I think its too early to upgrade.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Brian Napa, Ca

Personally, my frustration is in the fact that I'm always behind. I'm all for going and achieving new certs. I just hope that after forking out a large chunk of change on classroom training (to help focus my studies), that the MCSA&E certs are worth the time, and that an upgrade option is still out there when I’m done.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I would say stay about 1 step behind with your cert version. MS will not take away your cert if you stay at this pace. Be sure to have the real world experience before you go out and test and then it will be real...

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I have had my mc$e since '98 and am now finally and willingly looking at updating to the complete w2k track. I was actually getting pretty jazzed about hitting the books again after having a solid 3 years of work experience with 2k, but after seeing the 03 track, the steam is running low. Especially, since I know it would be at least a year to go through the track...

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Soumendra Ray Anonymous

Good Show! As expected, more exams, more m$ and more Microsoft.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Here we go again. I'm one of the folks who jumped on upgrading my NT 4.0 MCSE+I to 2000, thinking my certification would wash out. Then, because not enough folks upgraded, Microsoft decided to allow the NT 4.0 certification to hang around. And what about everything I read after moving to 2K that .Net wouldn't require an upgrade exam since it and XP where just basically 2K with .1 at the end. This really sucks. I guess Microsoft needs some more certification revenue. Maybe I'll just keep working on my CCIE and forget Microsoft altogether.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

OMFG i just read the 292 and 296 exams aren't even going to ready till june 2003. So much for upgrading LOL

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Upgrade or get left in the dust. You got about 2 years before you'll be in trouble. Take ur time. hehe

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

It is funny to see Microsoft choose SMS 2.0, SQL2k, ISA2k, etc. as elective exams for Win2003, left out other 2000s exams, such as Exchange 2000. Are you kidding, 2000s production such as ISA2K on Win2003 platform? Is MS running out of elective products?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Canada

Well, I really think MS is not being fair to the certs who just obtained the MCSE for win2k. I spent alot of money on getting my MCSE for win2k. Now I'm going to have to spend $428 CDN + just to not be outdated. Most companies have not even implemented win 2k. I say people who are MCSE for win2k should get a discount on the upgrade exams.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

All of this whining. You make it sound like the tests are hard! Get a backbone, show you can get certified without the moaning or get out of the field and make room for those of us with a pulse. It seems that this crowd is constantly moaning that the test are too easy and there are too many MCSEs or that they are always having to take more tests to show they are up to speed. Which is it? Personally, I would champion a CCIE level certification within the MCP program just so I could filter all you posers out.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Robert Cover Toronto

Bring it on ! I'm determined to destroy every brain cell I have left. My single remaining neuron needs more stress please. Companies need to transfer more burden to employes and not pay them anymore. I figure it will go far enough when one person can carry the IT economy on their backs. This is a good time for a latent masochist to be abused outside of any bedroom.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Ron Tallahassee

This is the first time I have viewed the comments on this web page. It was enlightening to see as many frustrated MCSEs' as there are, including myself. I studied on my own to get my current certs. This saved me a lot of money but I don't think it was the easiest way. Never the less... I did pick up very valuable knowledge going through the exam process and I hope to gain as much insight in future certs as I have in past. I might get off my tight wallet and take some courses in the future...

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous VN

Well. I got MCSE NT4 and spent several years look around for other cert (Cisco, Comptia). MS changes everything too fast. My colleague gets tired with MS certs :( so I will concider about the timing to starting for MS certs again. My next cert will be Linux or Security+

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Stuart England

I have MCSE4,MCSE2000 and "the hot one?" MCSA - never has any client of mine asked me for proff of my exams - the Microsoft exam tract - what is it really worth in the real world - it is regarded as a joke.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

The electives? - MCSE2000 exams was all about pushing the 2000 product ie upgrades - now with 2003 M$ are pushing SQL? ISA? SMS2!! but not email - people M$ need to rename the MSCE 2003 to "Marketing slave - capitol expenditure

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Exchange 5.5 and 2000 are not valid MCSA or MCSE Server 2003 electives because the products are not supported on Windows Server 2003! Exchange 2003 will become an elective for the new MCSA or MCSE later this year.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

is all about the money

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Jason Brisbane, QLD, AU

People complain about the cost of exam upgrades always, honestly if you are an IT professional surely a budget of $1500 (or whatever you estimate in your currency) to do the exams/training is just part of your career upgrade cycle. Hopefully you will recoup this in your paycheck/consultant fees by being more skilled.

John, I know some companies already in the RDP running Server 2003, but probably 2005 for many standard companies. It always boils down to justifying the need to upgrade based on business requirements.

Free vouchers to existing title holders would be a nice touch from MS.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous North Miami

I'm sick and tired of all this Microsoft upgrade bullshit. There's no market in Miami for an MCSE in 2000 or 2003. I hear MCSE's in the area are getting $14. Now they want me to dish out $250 more to upgrade?! I was getting more money selling checking accounts! The future of certs is Cisco, Linux and Unix. Let's face it, we ALL know what mission critical runs on. And we all know why Macs are so damn reliable. Ever been to a bank? Ever notice how everything is running in Unix or Java? Hmm...

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I am still having a hard time getting any of my clients to upgrade to Win2k. Finally, I will be upgrading at least 5 this year to 2000. I wont be able to sell my clients on 2003 until at least 2006 if not later. Microsoft is going to be in for a big surprise over the next several years--between the economy and their bullish marketing tactics.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Sorry Microsoft,
When I got certified on NT4 you shove 2000 on everyone. Just when I get around to getting certified on 2000, (Yeah, I was too BUSY upgrading LANs to take your 'conditional upgrade test') I see that 2003 is going to be shoved down our throats. Sorry dudes, I'm going after Linux-UNIX certifications, CISCO, Oracle and basically anything NON-Microsoft for a while and MAKE MORE MONEY!

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 G Anonymous

We're IT people -- this is considerably less effort than recertifying for developer material. A long time ago, I made the move from programming to systems. I agree with prior post who said - what if your employer wants new certified people and you're not - they fire you and get someone who is.
I was NT certified and thought why -- well I've got a good job and teach this stuff as well -- better to stay certified and add additional certs to -- look into CISSP and other security-related and product-related certs. Heck I used to say no Unix -- now I'm thinking seriously about adding that to my set. -- So stay focused and talk with certified peers to get the motivation -- besides - 2 exams is a piece of cake -- systemadmin stuff is not that much different from 2k to 2k3 or NT for that matter.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

It's about time Microsoft did something positive about certification upgrading since so many NT4 MCPs and MCSEs got 'hosed'. Microsoft should bring back the upgrade test (as two or four part) test and allow the many existing NT4 professionals another chance to upgrade to 2000-2003 levels and leave it there instead of giving a deadline as to taking it.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 JohnDear Indiana

Only thing that bothers me is that the Exchange 2000 exam does not count as elective. I guess this Email thing is just a fad that will pass

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 joe san diego

Cool! Only two tests to upgrade the MCSA & MCSE certification I have. I've taking so many of these tests now what's two more...

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Mark Kodiak

I am one test from MCSA and two from MCSE for Win2000. Should I stop and start all over again? Agree with other posts, the dollars are starting to add up, and what is the intended ROI at this point?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Henko TerBlanche Jersey City, NJ, USA

Just wondering: "Summer and fall" of which hemisphere was that again? Just kidding. ;-) But seriously, stop assuming that only people from the northern hemisphere are reading your magazine / website, and that only they are getting certified. Best regards from a snowy, post-blizzard Jersey City resident, formerly from the southern hemispere - Henko TerBlanche - MCSE-plus-I (NT4), MCSE (W2K), MCSA (W2K), Compaq, excuse me, HP ASE, A-plus, Network-plus, i-Net-plus, Server-plus, etc.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Well I agree with the statement about looking at other certification tracks. I myself have 13 MS certs as well as Citrix. If I can just take 1 exam and get my MCSE 2003 then I will (as long as it is not a 4 hour nightmare)... But if you plan to stay in the IT field Unix/Linux is good to know. I have knowledge of a few companies that have moved to Linux because of the M$ way of buisness.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 rc6502 Anonymous

I think that this is all well and good that there are such strong feelings against it, and I understand these feelings, however, as a college instructor who also runs a computer business as well I must look to other fields. Once upon a time there were thousands of corner gas stations that also provided wonderful services such as transmission repair, oil changes etc. And as cars gained computers and the advent of micro technology came about many of these service technicians refused to learn about them, while others learned about them, but refused to go take the certifications that are required for the field. As time went by we know the rest of the story, they went the way of the dinosaur. We live in a field where people do not get old. Once you get beyond a certain age in this field if you do not show your knowledge through certifications as well as education, and experience you to will go the way of the dinosaur. I may not always agree with the moves that many of these companies make, however, I like the field that I am in and I will do what it takes to continue in it.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 KRJoseph Nashville

I doubt I'll ever get the .Net MCSE. I had full employer support for NT4, but I've had to do 2K on my own and am still 2 tests short. I think I'll finish it, but I'm putting my effort into a MS degree in Info System. With Nearly 6 years experience, what do I gain from a 3rd MCSE?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 CESAR RAFFIN LONG BEACH

NO MORE GAMES.....NOW I REALIZE HOW MUCH MONEY I SPENT FOR NOTHING. WHAT WOULD BE THE NEXT ,
SERVER 2004 SOUND GOD ?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

It should be even more frustrating for someone 1/2 way through certifying, to find out they already are outdated. Especially with the price of training and exams going up and up lately, it just seems for what? What is the ROI? Is it worth certifying on a product now that your company will not likely use for another 2 years? That's what happened with W2K, and even some decided to skip it altogether, going from W98 to XP.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Stop whining! The bottom line is that any exam demonstrates a certain basic knowledge of the vendor's product. If you don't want to write the exams, then don't - nobody said you have to.

Making upgrade exams mandatory is a logical step. What if you took your new Gas-Electric hybrid to your dealership, only to find they're only certified in horses and wagon wheels?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

If cetification has vaolue to you --do it. if not, don't. It stands to reason not everyone gets the same value from recertification and not everyone needs to recertify with every release. Obiovusly some who sat through both Win2K and NT are probably better off exploring Cisco, Oracle, Checkpoint, SiteMinder, WebSphere or some Unix/Linux variants that add more value to their present jobs and/or careers.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 John Philadelphia

My company is currently planning on Windows 2003 implementation for the fall of this year. I will upgrade as soon as possible. I"m glad MS is willing to challange us with the new cert and has given current MCSA and MCSE's an upgrade path. Let's not lose sight of the fact that this cert is only as valuable as we make it in the market place.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

I can not take any more - really. What value are any of the MCSA,MCSE2000 exams that I have passed - so far I have passed 13 MCP exams and only one will count towards the .NET track - 210. I will also bet that the upgrade exam will also be a one shot deal as well

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

Hmmm... and when your company thinks you are either outdated or who knows what- without current certifications you'll say "I'm through with IT and I'm going back to flipping burgers!?"

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 john silicon vallet

This is crazy....Im done with it..No more certs....unless M$ Decides to give out free voucher and training materials to all current MCSE and MCSA of 2000.....And 1 more thing....I dont think any companies will implement 2003 Server untill 2005!!! Its just my thinking

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Jerry Anonymous

Is anyone else sick of taking exams? I don’t have time to study for a product that my employer will not move towards anytime soon.

Other then to sell new products why so many releases?

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Bloomington, MN

I've been through the NT4 track and the Windows 2000 track (including the painful Win2k accelerated exam). I'm starting to get tired of of this certifying game. I'm not a consultant any longer. I've got 5 years in my current company where I manage and build NT 4 and Win2k servers. I'm losing sight of the vaule of certification. It was a great stepping stone to launch my career when I first became an MCSE in 1997, but I think I'm about done with the certification madness. It's just becoming too much too fast.

Mon, Feb 17, 2003 Anonymous Anonymous

70-2003: Designing a Secure Revenue Stream?

Add Your Comment Now:

Your Name:(optional)
Your Email:(optional)
Your Location:(optional)
Comment:
Please type the letters/numbers you see above

Redmond Tech Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.