News

Monitoring ISA Server 2000

New version of Heroix RoboMon incorporates support for ISA Server 2000.

Heroix’s RoboMon software suite, which automates enterprise system problem detection and reporting, now incorporates monitoring for Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000. The software checks that ISA Server is continuously available and functioning, collects security information from server logs, and automatically alerts users to security intrusions, such as denial-of-service attacks. The software also monitors ISA Server’s Web caching feature for proper operation.

Heroix, Newton, Massachusetts 617-527-1550, www.heroix.com.

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Reader Comments:

Mon, Aug 23, 2004 Anonymous Anonymous

I work for an agency that has 1500
clients all XP,W2K, or win98. All of our server are W2K server including DHCP and DNS. Our PDC and BDC is NT40.
We have been doing this for about 2 weeks now. Does anyone think this will be a problem.

Tue, Oct 1, 2002 Jom loard

It's almost been two years since Windows 2000 hit the market. Yet Windows NT 4.0 maintains a strong market presence and is frequently installed on new servers. ENT asks analysts and customers

Tue, Sep 17, 2002 gabriel R.D.

dgsg

Sun, Aug 18, 2002 Cheri Olympia Washington

What is the difference between Windows NT and Windows Professional? I am applying for a job and they want experience with Windows NT. Thanks.

Fri, Aug 2, 2002 Anonymous Anonymous

Windows 2000 Server is by far the more scalable and reliable solution. It is also a lot easier to administer than NT 4.0 Server with native windows tools. Is Win2K for everyone? Nope! Will all applications run on Win2K like it did not NT4? NOPE -- most of them will run better.

Mon, Jul 22, 2002 Anonymous Anonymous

The reason so many originations are reluctant to move forward with Windows 2000 is that simply don’t understand Active Directory and they’re scared that their staff won’t be able to support it. The truth is that the majority of the administrators I’ve talked to at classes or TechNet briefings are barley capable of supporting a dozen servers in a single domain.

Wed, Jun 19, 2002 Ali Firdaus Jakarta, Indonesia

I think Windows NT 4.0 age has been elapsed. Now is age of Windows 2000. My company will upgrade Windows NT to Windows 2000 although have to upgrade hardware to qualified requirements.

Sun, May 19, 2002 Anonymous Anonymous

NT worrk station is a hopeless operating system, the drivers are not available.

Tue, Apr 30, 2002 Anonymous Anonymous

i like it it good the blue on the box is fun

Tue, Apr 30, 2002 Anonymous Anonymous

i like it it good the blue on the box is fun

Mon, Apr 22, 2002 Nawaz Anonymous

I have installed NT server(Stand alone). The same LAN has a PDC. I have to access PDC from standalone server and logon to PDC domain. It gives out some error and doesn't login

Fri, Apr 19, 2002 walter denver

I have a system that came with ME, I am going to replace ME with either NT4 or 2000. One problem I have with NT4 is no USB support. I like NT4 because it is smaller and faster, I hate bloatware.

But, NT4 is showing it's age. Difficult to work with larger HDDs, some software won't run (symantec 2002 unless you have service pack 6), and of course the USB. Also, I miss the device manager.

Fri, Apr 19, 2002 walter denver

I have a system that came with ME, I am going to replace ME with either NT4 or 2000. One problem I have with NT4 is no USB support. I like NT4 because it is smaller and faster, I hate bloatware.

But, NT4 is showing it's age. Difficult to work with larger HDDs, some software won't run (symantec 2002 unless you have service pack 6), and of course the USB. Also, I miss the device manager.

Tue, Feb 5, 2002 Chris Beegle Dallas

"If it ain't broke don't fix it"? What are you talking about. I was a manager at my previous job, they merged with another company who claimed that NT 4.0 was working fine. After the merger took place, I found out that it was acceptable to have it crash frequently as well. I have used LAN Man on OS/2, NT 3.1/3.5/3.51/NT 4/Win2k and even .net server. The biggest issue that is out there is that IT doesn't know how to utilize Win2k's features. With Window File Protection you don't have to worry about Developers replacing files that are used by the OS. The recovery console for Win2k rocks, it also works on an NT 4.0 box for disabling and enabling services or hung devices. Most admins don't know how to utilize Win2k's features. If you are running a IIS box and you shouldn't think about running it for NT 4.

Mon, Jan 21, 2002 Raul De La Garza Dallas, TX

We've deployed NT 4.0 Servers to our corporate as well as all of our remote sites as Lotus Notes mail servers. We do not have plans to upgrade to 2000 due to hardware requirements and a lack of need on the OS side as already noted by Jim Simmons and others. Upgrades in hardware will more be due to our decisions to upgrade Lotus Notes. Also, since we are a primarily Novell 'shop' we have no need for Microsoft's Active Directory. We find all of the functionality we need in security, desktop remote control, VPN services, application deployment, etc. using Novell's tried and true Novell Directory Services.

Wed, Jan 2, 2002 TG Buffalo,NY

Funny how you never hear success stories on the deployment of Active directory. My guess is it will be a few more years before that happens...

Tue, Dec 18, 2001 Alex Palfrey Barrie, Ontario

We love NT4.0 !
We have just deployed a new server running Win2K, it's great, but
however Microsoft should listen to their customers and continue support for NT4.0, As Jim Simmons said,"If it ain't broke don't fix it" !
Wakeup Microshaft !
After all isn't the customer always right ?

Fri, Dec 14, 2001 Jim Simmons Gulfport MS

I am a Independent Network Consultant and most of my client's are small businesses. I and my clients work under the "If it ain't broke don't fix it" and "what is the business purpose" rules. Small businesses cannot afford (at least here in MS) the expense of forced upgrades, when the current Network system offers them all the services they need or want, but hey none of my clients want to "fly" with their computers anyway.

Thu, Dec 13, 2001 Chris RTP NC

I can't agree more with Adam's approach. W2k is considerably more stable and administrator friendlier than NT. The policy management features (when well planned) are awesome..!!! Especially when you turn up your clients to w2kpro. Well that's my 1 and a half cents worth.

Thu, Dec 13, 2001 Adam Florida

My company is in the process of deploying Windows 2000. The domain currently runs in mixed mode. We still have a few NT4 BDCs living alongside our Windows 2000 Domain Controllers and a Variety of NT4 servers running various backend applications, but we are steadily migrating them all to windows 2000. The backbone of the client side of the network consists of a Citrix Metaframe XP Farm running on Windows 2000 Terminal Services. Group Policy is heavily used to configure the Terminal Server Profiles. Most Client's PCs however are still running windows 95, with a smaller number of them running Windows 98 or NT Workstation. Only our Developers and some of our IT Staff use Windows 2000 Professional. In my experience, Windows 2000 can be noticeably more reliable than NT4 and is definitely easier to manage.

Thu, Dec 13, 2001 Anonymous Anonymous

I've got niche applications that do not run on Windows 2000. I have to stay on NT4.

Thu, Dec 13, 2001 Ryan Avery Grand Rapids

Our small company is still running NT as our PDC and DHCP server, but are recognizing the advantages to AD and already planning our move to 2000 across the board and hope to have it implemented by February of '02. We'll probably keep one NT server around for File and Print services though. Microsoft is phasing out NT in a good fashion I think.

Wed, Dec 12, 2001 MW Republica de Tejas

For a system that either has no attachment to the Internet at all or hides behind a DMZ, it makes a reasonable file and print server for a Win NT and 9X mixed network. A WIN2K server doesn't offer much to the mixed WIN9X/NT systems outside of a slightly improved stability for the server systems and improved TCP/IP operation. The biggest problems I had as an admin had to do with the desktop applications with Office 97 Pro applications being the most trouble. For email and firewall applications, I'd suggest other vendor products. I am hoping to find some used non-upgrade copies of NT Server from companies that are on the upgrade bandwagon to 2K or XP.

Wed, Dec 12, 2001 Andy Campbell Atlanta

For small companies using file servers, and a single domain, NT4.0 is a good solution. It is cost effective, and once set up, it is a very manageable solution.

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